West of England

 

 

 


 

11 February

The_Battle_of_the_Somme_film_image2Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  The Battle of the Somme gave its 1916 audience an unprecedented insight into the realities of trench warfare, controversially including the depiction of dead and wounded soldiers. It shows scenes of the build-up to the infantry offensive including the massive preliminary bombardment, coverage of the first day of the battle (the bloodiest single day in Britain’s military history) and depictions of the small gains and massive costs of the attack. The Battle of the Somme remains one of the most successful British films ever made. It is estimated over 20 million tickets were sold in Great Britain in the first two months of release, and the film was distributed world-wide to demonstrate to allies and neutrals Britain’s commitment to the First World War. It is the source of many of that conflict’s most iconic images. It was made by British official cinematographers Geoffrey Malins and John McDowell. Though it was not intended as a feature film, once the volume and quality of their footage had been seen in London, the British Topical Committee for War Films decided to compile a feature-length film.  Find out more at Wikipedia     Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    With live orchestral accompaniment by  Exeter Symphony Orchestra Conducted by Brian Northcott.  Exeter Cathedral, Exeter Link

12 February

The_Battle_of_the_Somme_film_image2Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  For film details see 11 Feb above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    With live orchestral accompaniment by  Exeter Symphony Orchestra Conducted by Brian Northcott. Teignmouth Pavillions, Teignmouth, Link

22 February

Introducing Max (Dir. Various) (Screening format – not known) The late 1920s was the heyday for film actor and comedian Max Davidson (1875 – 1950). Engaged at the famous Hal Roach Studios for a series of Jewish comedies which were set around his ‘beard’ character Max developed some of the greatest comedies of the era and yet Davidson is hardly remembered today so this is a timely night celebrating the work of Max Davidson including the screening of three key films (titles tbc) from Max’s time working for the great king of comedy Hal Roach.  Presented by South West Silents and DAVAR Bristol (The Jewish Cultural Institute in Bristol).  The Orpheus Cinema, Henleaze, Bristol  Link

26 February

hamlet 1921 aHamlet (Dir. Svend Gade/Heinz Schall, 1921) (Screening format – not known, 110 mins) A unique vision of the cursed Dane, this silent take on Shakespeare’s drama stands the test of time thanks to a unique and brilliant twist. Starring the gorgeous Danish siren Asta Nielsen this adaptation supposes that Hamlet’s inner turmoil centred on having being born a girl, but having to pass incognito as the male heir to the throne. Visually stunning and tragically fated, this will be a familiar yet interesting adaptation for young and old fans of the Bard. Find out more at  imdb.com  Presented by South West Silents as part of the Borderlines  Film Festival.    With live piano accompaniment from Lillian Henley.  The Courtyard, Hereford Link