London and South East

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1 January

lodger-1The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1927) (Screening format – DCP, 90mins) A serial killer known as “The Avenger” is on the loose in London, murdering blonde women. A mysterious man (Ivor Novello)  arrives at the house of Mr. and Mrs. Bunting looking for a room to rent. The Bunting’s daughter (June Tripp)  is a blonde model and is seeing one of the detectives (Malcolm Keen) assigned to the case. The detective becomes jealous of the lodger and begins to suspect he may be the avenger.  Based on a best-selling novel by Marie Belloc Lowndes, first published in 1913, loosely based on the Jack the Ripper murders,  The Lodger was Hitchcock’s first thriller, and his first critical and commercial success. Made shortly after his return from Germany, the film betrays the influence of the German expressionist tradition established in such films as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) and Nosferatu (1922). Find out more at silentfilm.org  With recorded Nitin Sawhney score.  BFI Southbank, London. Link

2 January

Sunrise_vintageSunrise: A Song Of Two Humans (Dir. F W Murnau, 1927) (Screening format – DCP, 94mins) A woman vacationing from the City (Margaret Livingston) lingers in a lakeside town. After dark, she goes to a farmhouse where the Man (George O’Brien) and the Wife (Janet Gaynor) live. She whistles from the fence outside. The Man is torn, but finally departs, leaving his wife with the memories of better times when they were deeply in love. The man and woman kiss passionately. She wants him to sell his farm and join her in the city. Then she suggests that he solve the problem of his wife by drowning her….Considered by some to be the greatest film of the silent era, Sunrise is at very least a combination of artistic triumph and artistic enigma. Perhaps the finest example of the melding of German visual design with American studio production techniques, Sunrise is an oddly disconnected story that still manages to reach its audience with its tremendous emotional undercurrent. Find out more at Wikipedia With Hugo Riesenfeld recorded score.  BFI Southbank, London  Link

3 January

navigator_the_02-posterThe Navigator (Dir. Donald Crisp/Buster Keaton, 1924) (Screening format – 35mm, 59)   In The Navigator,  rich socialite Rollo Treadway (Buster Keaton) and his girlfriend (Kathryn McGuire) manage to find themselves adrift on an empty ocean liner.  At first their only problem is a lack of servants and an awkward deckchair but soon Rollo is in a diving suit battling  swordfish and octopus while his girlfriend is captured by hungry cannibals.     Find out more at allmovie.com .    With recorded soundtrack.  Picturehouse Central, London Link

pandoras-box-01Pandora’s Box (Dir.  G W Pabst, 1928) (Screening format – 35mm, 133mins) Pabst’s landmark adaptation of two plays by Frank Wedekind boasts an iconic performance by Louise Brooks as Lulu, the guiltless, guileless beauty who wreaks havoc among all those seduced by her raw sexuality, only to fall prey to an even darker force. A precise and subtle expressionism inflects the sets, costumes and make-up, highlighting the ruinous appeal of unbridled eroticism.  Find out more at  silentfilm.org  With live piano accompaniment.  BFI Southbank, London   Link

piccadilly-1-archivePiccadilly  (Dir. E A Dupont, 1929) (Screening format – DCP, 109mins) London’s West End is given a glittery expressionist veneer, with a fraught sexual triangle arising when a nightclub boss finds himself entranced by the slinky sensuality of the table-top dancing of a Chinese member of his kitchen staff (Wong in fine fettle). Both sleaze and sophistication are admirably evoked by Alfred Junge’s art direction. Find out more at   silentfilm.org    With recorded Neil Brand score.  BFI Southbank, London   Link

4 January

Sunrise_vintageSunrise: A Song Of Two Humans (Dir. F W Murnau, 1927) (Screening format – DCP, 94mins) A woman vacationing from the City (Margaret Livingston) lingers in a lakeside town. After dark, she goes to a farmhouse where the Man (George O’Brien) and the Wife (Janet Gaynor) live. She whistles from the fence outside. The Man is torn, but finally departs, leaving his wife with the memories of better times when they were deeply in love. The man and woman kiss passionately. She wants him to sell his farm and join her in the city. Then she suggests that he solve the problem of his wife by drowning her….Considered by some to be the greatest film of the silent era, Sunrise is at very least a combination of artistic triumph and artistic enigma. Perhaps the finest example of the melding of German visual design with American studio production techniques, Sunrise is an oddly disconnected story that still manages to reach its audience with its tremendous emotional undercurrent. Find out more at Wikipedia With Hugo Riesenfeld recorded score.  BFI Southbank, London  Link

5 January

lodger-1The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1927) (Screening format – DCP, 90mins) A serial killer known as “The Avenger” is on the loose in London, murdering blonde women. A mysterious man (Ivor Novello)  arrives at the house of Mr. and Mrs. Bunting looking for a room to rent. The Bunting’s daughter (June Tripp)  is a blonde model and is seeing one of the detectives (Malcolm Keen) assigned to the case. The detective becomes jealous of the lodger and begins to suspect he may be the avenger.  Based on a best-selling novel by Marie Belloc Lowndes, first published in 1913, loosely based on the Jack the Ripper murders,  The Lodger was Hitchcock’s first thriller, and his first critical and commercial success. Made shortly after his return from Germany, the film betrays the influence of the German expressionist tradition established in such films as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) and Nosferatu (1922). Find out more at silentfilm.org  With live piano accompaniment.  BFI Southbank, London. Link

6 January

pandoras-box-01Pandora’s Box (Dir.  G W Pabst, 1928) (Screening format – 35mm, 133mins) Pabst’s landmark adaptation of two plays by Frank Wedekind boasts an iconic performance by Louise Brooks as Lulu, the guiltless, guileless beauty who wreaks havoc among all those seduced by her raw sexuality, only to fall prey to an even darker force. A precise and subtle expressionism inflects the sets, costumes and make-up, highlighting the ruinous appeal of unbridled eroticism.  Find out more at  silentfilm.org  With live piano accompaniment.  BFI Southbank, London   Link

7 January

piccadilly-1-archivePiccadilly  (Dir. E A Dupont, 1929) (Screening format – DCP, 109mins) London’s West End is given a glittery expressionist veneer, with a fraught sexual triangle arising when a nightclub boss finds himself entranced by the slinky sensuality of the table-top dancing of a Chinese member of his kitchen staff (Wong in fine fettle). Both sleaze and sophistication are admirably evoked by Alfred Junge’s art direction. Find out more at   silentfilm.org    With recorded Neil Brand score.  BFI Southbank, London   Link

8 January

pandoras-box-01Pandora’s Box (Dir.  G W Pabst, 1928) (Screening format – 35mm, 133mins) Pabst’s landmark adaptation of two plays by Frank Wedekind boasts an iconic performance by Louise Brooks as Lulu, the guiltless, guileless beauty who wreaks havoc among all those seduced by her raw sexuality, only to fall prey to an even darker force. A precise and subtle expressionism inflects the sets, costumes and make-up, highlighting the ruinous appeal of unbridled eroticism.  Find out more at  silentfilm.org  With live piano accompaniment.  BFI Southbank, London   Link

Vampyr1932Vampyr (Dir. Carl Theodore Dreyer, 1932)  (Screening format – not known, 83mins) (Technically, Dryer’s first sound film but with very little dialogue and extensive use made of inter-titles) Staying at a country inn, Allan Grey scoffs at the notion of supernatural death before being forced to believe that there may be things beyond his understanding. The skills of director and cameraman induce a similar confusion on the part of those watching, as we encounter one of cinema’s great nightmares. Dreyer offers few explanations for the phenomena on screen:  strange and frightening things may just happen. Vampyr  opened to a generally negative reception from audiences and critics. Dreyer edited the film after its German premiere and it opened to more mixed opinions at its French debut. The film was long considered a low point in Dreyer’s career, but modern critical reception to the film has become much more favorable with critics praising the film’s disorienting visual effects and atmosphere. Find out more at Wikipedia    With live musical accompaniment by Minima and Stephen Horne.   Barbican, London  Link 

The Wizard of Oz  (Dir.  Larry Semon, 1925)     Putting Pants on Philip  (Dir.  Clyde Bruckman, 1927)       (Screening format – not known,    93/19 mins)   A radically different re-telling of the Wizard of Oz story, both from Baum’s original book and from the later Judy Garland version, this version sees the story focus primarily on the scarecrow character of the original stroy, played by director Semon.  The Tin Man villain is played by Oliver Hardy in his pre-Laurel & Hardy days while Dorothy Dwan plays Dorothy. Find out more at imdb.comPutting Pants on Philip  stars Laurel and Hardy but was made before they become a real partnership.  Ollie is Piedmont J. Mumblethunder, a pillar of society, waiting at dockside to welcome his cousin Philip (Stan) from Scotland.  But Philip is a sex-mad Scot in a kilt who sets about chasing attractive Dorothy Coburn at every opportunity. Find out more at  wikipedia.org .    With live organ accompaniment by renowned organist Donald MacKenzie.  Troxy, London E1    Link

napoleon-portraitNapoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins)  Gance’s epic biopic of Napoleon traces his career from his schooldays (where a snowball fight is staged like a military campaign), his flight from Corsica, through the French Revolution (where a real storm is intercut with a political storm) and the Terror, culminating in his triumphant invasion of Italy in 1797.  The film ends here because it was intended to be part one of six, but Gance was unable to raise the money to make further episodes. The film’s legendary reputation is due to the astonishing range of techniques that Gance uses to tell his story ( including fast cutting, extensive close-ups, hand-held camera shots, location shooting, point of view shots, multiple camera set-ups, multiple exposure, superimposition and under water shots) culminating in the final twenty-minute triptych sequence, which alternates widescreen panoramas with complex multiple- image montages.  This is the most complete version of the film available, compiled by Academy Award-winning film-maker, archivist and historian Kevin Brownlow who napoleon-panoramaspent over 50 years tracking down surviving prints from archives around the world since he first saw a 9.5mm version as a schoolboy in 1954.  Find out more at  BFI and  Wikipedia   With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   Regent Street Cinema, London Link

10 January

What matters deafness of the ear when the mind hears?  (Dir. Various, 1904-2016)  (Screening format – 16/35mm) A programme of silent films designed to be accessible to people with hearing impairments as well as hearing audiences, creating a shared and uniquely immersive experience of silent film screened here without accompanying soundtrack.  Films include; The Ex-Convict (Edwin S. Porter, 1904), The Wonder Ring (Stan Brakhage 1955), Time Piece (David Leister, 1989), Tiny Tim’s New Year Gifts [Les Etrennes de Bout-de-zan] (Louis Feuillade 1913), Split Second (Bea Haut, 2016), Ghosts Before Breakfast (Hans Richter, 1928), Rescued by Rover (Cecil Hepworth and Lewis Fitzhamon, 1905), Daisy Doodad’s Dial (Florence Turner, 1914).  Followed, a panel of experts made up of Bryony Dixon (BFI), Pamela Hutchinson (Silent London) and Maverick Litchfield-Kelley (Neath Films),discuss parallels between cinema in the modern and silent era, hosted by film journalist Ian Hayden Smith.   ICA, London Link

12 January

danse-du-feu-01Restored Silent Films  A collection of early silents selected by Martin Scorsese,  this astute programme ranges from the Lumières’ very first moving images to DW Griffith, Georges Méliès’ pioneering trickery and Edwin S Porter’s landmark narrative short The Great Train Robbery. The Floorwalker, Chaplin’s department-store frolic meanwhile, shows the new medium’s rapid development. Also featured is Alice Guy Blaché – the first female film director, and key industry figure in France and the US. With live piano accompaniment.  BFI Southbank, London  Link

Sunrise_vintageSunrise: A Song Of Two Humans (Dir. F W Murnau, 1927) (Screening format – DCP, 94mins) A woman vacationing from the City (Margaret Livingston) lingers in a lakeside town. After dark, she goes to a farmhouse where the Man (George O’Brien) and the Wife (Janet Gaynor) live. She whistles from the fence outside. The Man is torn, but finally departs, leaving his wife with the memories of better times when they were deeply in love. The man and woman kiss passionately. She wants him to sell his farm and join her in the city. Then she suggests that he solve the problem of his wife by drowning her….Considered by some to be the greatest film of the silent era, Sunrise is at very least a combination of artistic triumph and artistic enigma. Perhaps the finest example of the melding of German visual design with American studio production techniques, Sunrise is an oddly disconnected story that still manages to reach its audience with its tremendous emotional undercurrent. Find out more at Wikipedia With Hugo Riesenfeld recorded score.  BFI Southbank, London  Link

15 January

danse-du-feu-01Restored Silent Films  A collection of early silents selected by Martin Scorsese,  this astute programme ranges from the Lumières’ very first moving images to DW Griffith, Georges Méliès’ pioneering trickery and Edwin S Porter’s landmark narrative short The Great Train Robbery. The Floorwalker, Chaplin’s department-store frolic meanwhile, shows the new medium’s rapid development. Also featured is Alice Guy Blaché – the first female film director, and key industry figure in France and the US. With live piano accompaniment.  BFI Southbank, London  Link

napoleon-portraitNapoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) For details see  8 Jan above.   With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   New Park Cinema, Chichester   Link

18 January

Orchids and ermine posterOrchids and Ermine (Dir. Alfred Santell, 1927) (Screening format – 35mm, 69mins)   Pink Watson (Colleen Moore)  dreams of marrying rich. She gets a job as hotel switchboard operator.   An oil millionaire named Tabor (Jack Mulhall) checks in to the hotel and is set upon by gold-diggers. He swaps places with his assistant Hank (Sam Hardy) and poses as a chauffeur. Pink falls for Tabor without knowing of his fortunes  while Hank gets in Orchids and Ermine Coleen Moore and 6 year old Mickey Rooneytrouble under the identity of his employer by charming Pink’s friend Ermintrude (Gwen Lee). Hank quickly learns the downside of the attentions of  gold diggers. Hank advises Tabor on the techniques to seduce a lady, because Tabor has fallen in love with Pink. These tips do not prove to be helpful and she tries to get rid of him in the mass of the New York streets. Will Tabor ever get the girl and will Pink get her millionaire?  Colleen Moore was one of the really great comediennes of the silent era and Orchids and Ermine shows her off at her very best. It was a very young Mickey Rooney’s first feature film (aged six) and also features Hedda Hopper before she went on to become the acid-tongued gossip columnist so beautifully portrayed by Helen Mirren in Trumbo (2016).  Find out more at  silent-volume.blogspot.co.uk   Presented by the Kennington Bioscope with live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, LambethLink

piccadilly-1-archivePiccadilly  (Dir. E A Dupont, 1929) (Screening format – Not known, 109mins) London’s West End is given a glittery expressionist veneer, with a fraught sexual triangle arising when a nightclub boss finds himself entranced by the slinky sensuality of the table-top dancing of a Chinese member of his kitchen staff (Wong in fine fettle). Both sleaze and sophistication are admirably evoked by Alfred Junge’s art direction. Find out more at   silentfilm.org    Birkbeck Uni, 43 Gordon Sq, London Link

20 January

Charlie Chaplin: The Essanay Comedies Restored – DVD Launch.   Join the BFI and Cinema Museum for a special evening celebrating the comic genius of Charlie Chaplin and the groundbreaking films he made at the Essanay studio during 1915. The BFI’s Douglas Weir and Chaplin expert and writer Glen Mitchell will be in conversation and introduce new restorations of The Champion and The Bank. They will also reveal an interesting Chaplin connection recently unearthed in the BFI National Archive featuring another legendary British comic talent. The newly restored Essanay Comedies DVD and Blu-ray will be on sale at a special launch price on the evening (ahead on the official 23 January release date), along with other silent cinema BFI DVD and Blu-rays at bargain prices.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth Link

21 January

pandoras-box-01Pandora’s Box (Dir.  G W Pabst, 1928) (Screening format – 35mm, 133mins) Pabst’s landmark adaptation of two plays by Frank Wedekind boasts an iconic performance by Louise Brooks as Lulu, the guiltless, guileless beauty who wreaks havoc among all those seduced by her raw sexuality, only to fall prey to an even darker force. A precise and subtle expressionism inflects the sets, costumes and make-up, highlighting the ruinous appeal of unbridled eroticism.  Find out more at  silentfilm.org  With live piano accompaniment.  BFI Southbank, London   Link

22 January

cops_1922-keatonseven_chances_1925bCops (Dir. Buster Keaton, 1922)+ Seven Chances (Dir. Buster Keaton, 1925) (Screening format – DCP, 22/56mins) One of Keaton’s most iconic and brilliantly-constructed short films, Cops sees him accidentally gets on the bad side of the entire Los Angeles Police Department during a parade, and chased all over town.  Find out more at busterkeaton.comIn Seven Chances,   on the morning of his 27th birthday, James Shannon (Keaton) is informed that he stands to inherit $7 million if he is married by 7 o’clock that evening. He proposes to his sweetheart, but she rejects him when he offends her by stating that he must marry a girl–any girl–in order to come into a fortune.  He proposes to seven more girls who all turn him down,  Then all of a sudden there are lots of willing brides all looking for him!!  Can he escape, marry the girl of his dreams and inherit the money?  Find out more at wikipedia.org  .  Prersented in partnership with the Slapstick Festival, Bristol.  With live piano accompaniment by Guenter A. Buchwald.  Barbican, London Link

26 January

lodger-1The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1927) (Screening format – DCP, 90mins) A serial killer known as “The Avenger” is on the loose in London, murdering blonde women. A mysterious man (Ivor Novello)  arrives at the house of Mr. and Mrs. Bunting looking for a room to rent. The Bunting’s daughter (June Tripp)  is a blonde model and is seeing one of the detectives (Malcolm Keen) assigned to the case. The detective becomes jealous of the lodger and begins to suspect he may be the avenger.  Based on a best-selling novel by Marie Belloc Lowndes, first published in 1913, loosely based on the Jack the Ripper murders,  The Lodger was Hitchcock’s first thriller, and his first critical and commercial success. Made shortly after his return from Germany, the film betrays the influence of the German expressionist tradition established in such films as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) and Nosferatu (1922). Find out more at silentfilm.org  With recorded Nitin Sawhney score.  BFI Southbank, London. Link

27 January

Sunrise_vintageSunrise: A Song Of Two Humans (Dir. F W Murnau, 1927) (Screening format – DCP, 94mins) A woman vacationing from the City (Margaret Livingston) lingers in a lakeside town. After dark, she goes to a farmhouse where the Man (George O’Brien) and the Wife (Janet Gaynor) live. She whistles from the fence outside. The Man is torn, but finally departs, leaving his wife with the memories of better times when they were deeply in love. The man and woman kiss passionately. She wants him to sell his farm and join her in the city. Then she suggests that he solve the problem of his wife by drowning her….Considered by some to be the greatest film of the silent era, Sunrise is at very least a combination of artistic triumph and artistic enigma. Perhaps the finest example of the melding of German visual design with American studio production techniques, Sunrise is an oddly disconnected story that still manages to reach its audience with its tremendous emotional undercurrent. Find out more at Wikipedia With Hugo Riesenfeld recorded score.  BFI Southbank, London  Link

28 January

piccadilly-1-archivePiccadilly  (Dir. E A Dupont, 1929) (Screening format – DCP, 109mins) London’s West End is given a glittery expressionist veneer, with a fraught sexual triangle arising when a nightclub boss finds himself entranced by the slinky sensuality of the table-top dancing of a Chinese member of his kitchen staff (Wong in fine fettle). Both sleaze and sophistication are admirably evoked by Alfred Junge’s art direction. Find out more at   silentfilm.org    With live piano accompaniment by Neil Brand.  BFI Southbank, London   Link

29 January

napoleon-portraitNapoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) For details see  8 Jan above.   With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   New Park Cinema, Chichester   Link

An Afternoon With Buster Keaton  (Screening format – not known) Laugh away the January blues with this silent comedy afternoon featuring Buster Keaton on the big screen.  Films include;  The Cameraman (Dir. Edward Sedgwick & Buster Keaton, 1928 )   The last truly great film from Buster Keaton, one of silent cinema’s trailblazers. It remains as charming as it is hilarious.  The story sees, Keaton, as always, trying to win the heart of a pretty girl, this time the secretary at a newsreel production company. Deciding to trade in his tintype camera, he tries to make it in the world of moving pictures, but faces an array of obstacles, including, amongst other things, a jealous rival cameraman, his own lack of experience, and an interfering monkey. Find out more at Wikipedia  and:   The Scarecrow 1920 KeatonScarecrow,(Dirs. Edward F Cline/Buster keaton, 1920) in which Buster plays a farmhand who competes with Joe Roberts to win the love of the farmer’s daughter (Sybil Seely). Running from a dog , Buster falls into a hay thresher and ruins his clothes. Forced to borrow the clothes of a nearby scarecrow, Sybil believes Buster to be proposing as she stumbles upon him tying his shoe. The couple speed off on a motorcycle with Joe and the farmer (played by Buster’s father, Joe) in hot pursuit. Scooping up a minister during the chase, they are married on the speeding motorcycle and splash into a stream at the climax of the ceremony and the film. Find out more at imdb.com.    With live accompaniment on the Wurlitza organ by Donald MacKenzie.  The Musical Museum at Kew Bridge, London Link


NB. Whilst every effort has been taken to ensure that the information contained in these listings is accurate, silentfilmcalendar.com can take no responsibility for any errors or inaccuracies. You are strongly advised to confirm with the venue that the event remains as detailed, particularly if traveling any distance to attend.