November 2016

1 November

lodger_1927_posterThe Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1927) (Screening format – not known ) A serial killer known as “The Avenger” is on the loose in London, murdering blonde women. A mysterious man (Ivor Novello)  arrives at the house of Mr. and Mrs. Bunting looking for a room to rent. The Bunting’s daughter (June Tripp)  is a blonde model and is seeing one of the detectives (Malcolm Keen) assigned to the case. The detective becomes jealous of the lodger and begins to suspect he may be the avenger.  Based on a best-selling novel by Marie Belloc Lowndes, first published in 1913, loosely based on the Jack the Ripper murders,  The Lodger was Hitchcock’s first thriller, and his first critical and commercial success. Made shortly after his return from Germany, the film betrays the influence of the German expressionist tradition established in such films as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) and Nosferatu (1922). Find out more at silentfilm.org  With live musical accompaniment by Minima.    Bacon Theatre, Dean Close School, Cheltenham,   Link

Kennington Bioscope Special – Silent To Sound     Using clips from British, French and German films, historian Geoff Brown investigates the turbulent European scene in the period of transition to sound, 1929/1930. Studios struggled to shift from silent prix_de_beaute_miss_europe_film_posterfeature production to films that talked, sang, and made noises. Britain briefly won the technological advantage, but lost out to others who used it more imaginatively.  The feature in the second half will be the UK premier of the original restored silent version of Prix de Beauté (Dir. Augusto Genina, 1930), prixdebeaute-originalfeaturing Louise Brooks as Lucienne, typist and gorgeous bathing beauty, who decides to enter the ‘Miss Europe’ pageant sponsored by the French newspaper she works for. She finds her jealous lover Andre violently disapproves of such events and tries to withdraw, but it’s too late…..Find out more at silentfilm.org     Presented by the Kennington Bioscope in conjunction with the AHRC-funded project ‘British Silent Cinema and the Transition to Sound’.   With live piano accompaniment by Stephen Horne.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London  Link        [NB  Note date change.  Previously scheduled for 2 Nov]   

2 November

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)      The Battle of the Somme gave its 1916 audience an unprecedented insight into the realities of trench warfare, controversially including the depiction of dead and wounded soldiers. It shows scenes of the build-up to the infantry offensive including the massive preliminary bombardment, coverage of the first day of the battle (the bloodiest single day in Britain’s military history) and depictions of the small gains and massive costs of the attack. The Battle of the Somme remains one of the most successful British films ever made. It is estimated over 20 million tickets were sold in Great Britain in the first two months of release, and the film was distributed world-wide to demonstrate to allies and neutrals Britain’s commitment to the First World War. It is the source of many of that conflict’s most iconic images. It was made by British official cinematographers Geoffrey Malins and John McDowell. Though it was not intended as a feature film, once the volume and quality of their footage had been seen in London, the British Topical Committee for War Films decided to compile a feature-length film.  Find out more at Wikipedia     With live musical accompaniment by Stephen Horne and Martin Pyne. Westgate Hall, Canterbury   Link

3 November

nosferatushadowNosferatu  (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922)  (Screening format  – not known,  81mins) A German Expressionist horror film starring Max Schreck as the vampire Count Orlok. The film was an unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula, with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel (for instance,”vampire” became “Nosferatu” and “Count Dracula” became “Count Orlok”). Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaptation, and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed. However, a few prints of Nosferatu survived, and the film came to be regarded as an influential masterpiece of cinema.  In the film, the sinister Count Orlok, travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at Wikipedia.   Live musical accompaniment by My Octopus Mind.  Curzon Community Cinema, Clevedon, N Somerset View

4 November

Silent film evening    Film titles to be confirmed. Live organ accompaniment by renowned organist Donald MacKenzie  The Caird Hall, Dundee, Scotland  Link

The_Battle_of_the_Somme_film_image2Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  The Battle of the Somme gave its 1916 audience an unprecedented insight into the realities of trench warfare, controversially including the depiction of dead and wounded soldiers. It shows scenes of the build-up to the infantry offensive including the massive preliminary bombardment, coverage of the first day of the battle (the bloodiest single day in Britain’s military history) and depictions of the small gains and massive costs of the attack. The Battle of the Somme remains one of the most successful British films ever made. It is estimated over 20 million tickets were sold in Great Britain in the first two months of release, and the film was distributed world-wide to demonstrate to allies and neutrals Britain’s commitment to the First World War. It is the source of many of that conflict’s most iconic images. It was made by British official cinematographers Geoffrey Malins and John McDowell. Though it was not intended as a feature film, once the volume and quality of their footage had been seen in London, the British Topical Committee for War Films decided to compile a feature-length film.  Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from the Durham University Symphony Orchestra.  Gala Theatre, Durham Link

5 November

Erotikon 1929Erotikon (Dir.Gustav Machatý, 1929) (Screening format – 35mm, 108mins)   Czech director Gustav Machatý pushed the boundaries of accepted taste and fashion, resulting in some of the most scandalous European films of the era. Erotikon explores the moral consequences of a night of unbridled passion between a Prague playboy and a provincial station-master’s daughter. Abandoned by the philanderer, she marries another man, but still dreams of the passion she experienced. Recently restored by the Czech National Film Archive, Erotikon is a landmark in European silent film and features Ita Rina, Oleg Fjord and Luiji Serventi. In partnership with Czech Centre, London and  National Film Archive Prague.  For more information see  silentfilm.org   With live musical accompaniment.  Barbican, London  Link

6 November

napoleon 3Napoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – not known332 mins) Gance’s epic biopic of Napoleon traces his career from his schooldays (where a snowball fight is staged like a military campaign), his flight from Corsica, through the French Revolution (where a real storm is intercut with a political storm) and the Terror, culminating in his triumphant invasion of Italy in 1797.  The film ends here because it was intended to be part one of six, but Gance was unable to raise the money to make further episodes. The film’s legendary reputation is due to the astonishing range of techniques that Gance uses to tell his story ( including fast cutting, extensive close-ups, hand-held camera shots, location shooting, point of view shots, multiple camera set-ups, multiple exposure, superimposition and under water shots) culminating in the final twenty-minute triptych sequence, which alternates widescreen panoramas with complex multiple- image montages projected simultaneously on three screens.   Napoleon_1927_4piece

This is the most complete version of the film available, compiled by Academy Award-winning film-maker, archivist and historian Kevin Brownlow who spent over 50 years tracking down surviving prints from archives around the world since he first saw a 9.5mm version as a schoolboy in 1954. Brownlow and his colleagues at Photoplay, initially the late David Gill, and then Patrick Stanbury, worked with the BFI National Archive on a series of restorations. The film version has been screened only 4 times in the UK since the year 2000.  Find out more at  BFI and  Wikipedia  With full orchestral music accompaniment composed and conducted by Carl Davis.  Royal Festival Hall, London  Link

7 November

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from  the Thames Youth Orchestra conducted by Simon Ferris.  Twickenham Stadium, Twickenham, London Link

speedy_posterbattle_of_the_century_1928Speedy (Dir. Ted Wilde, 1928)   and   Battle of the Century (Dir. Clyde Bruckman, 1927 ) (Screening format – not known, 86/19   mins)  Harold Lloyd saves the last horse-drawn trolley car from extinction in Speedy, his last silent comedy – and one of his best. An engaging caper shot on location in New York, it shows off the city as it was in 1928, including a beautiful sequence at Coney Island’s Luna Park and a breathtaking finale chase through Manhattan. In Laurel and Hardy’s short, Battle of the Century, which concludes with silent comedy’s biggest ever pie fight. The final reel was re-discovered in 2015 having been lost for decades. Find out more at wikipedia.org  and wikipedia.org  Presented as part of the Leeds International Film Festival.  City Varities, Leeds Link

lonesome_posterLonesome (Dir. Paul Lejos, 1928) (Screening format – not known, 69mins)  Lonesome is a lost treasure from Hollywood’s golden age, directed by pioneering explorer-anthropologist-doctor-filmmaker, Paul Fejos. It’s a New York City symphony set in Coney Island during the Fourth of July weekend, with dynamic camera work, experimental editing and an innovative use of colour tinting and superimposition effects. Largely silent, the film was made in the early days of the talkie and has three token dialogue scenes.   Mary is a telephone operator who lives alone and is lonely. Jim is a factory worker who lives alone and is lonely. Each decides to go to the beach  and both are captivated with each other, eventually realizing that they really do like each other. Having gone from loneliness to finding love, enjoying the company of each other and having fun, they are  separated from each other. Only knowing each other’s first name, Jim and Mary are desperate to find each other. Will these two lonesome individuals who have discovered their love for each other…lose it all that same day? Find out more at allmovie.com   Presented as part of the Leeds International Film Festival. With live accompaniment by Simon Lindley on the town hall pipe organ.  Leeds Town Hall – Victoria Hall, Leeds Link

exit_smilingExit Smiling (Dir. Sam Taylor, 1926)  and  My Wife’s Relations  (Dir. Edward F Cline/Buster Keaton, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 77/22 mins)  Beatrice Lillie was ‘the funniest woman of our civilisation’ according to Noel Coward, and Chaplin himself said she was his ‘female counterpart’. She hated making films and made only one my-wifes-relationssilent – this winning, memorable comedy about a disastrous touring theatre company. Lillie’s wonderful performance as Violet, the wardrobe mistress who dreams of stardom, will twang your heartstrings even while you’re laughing. Find out more at wikipedia.orgIn My Wife’s Relations, a judicial error results in Buster being married to a large domineering woman with an unfriendly father and four bullying brothers, a screening which includes a newly rediscovered shot of one of Keaton’s famous daredevil stunts. Find out more at busterkeaton.com   Presented as part of the Leeds International Film Festival.  City Varities, Leeds Link

hamlet 1921 aHamlet (Dir. Svend Gade/Heinz Schall, 1921) (Screening format – not known, 110 mins) A unique vision of the cursed Dane, this silent take on Shakespeare’s drama stands the test of time thanks to a unique and brilliant twist. Starring the gorgeous Danish siren Asta Nielsen this adaptation supposes that Hamlet’s inner turmoil centred on having being born a girl, but having to pass incognito as the male heir to the throne. Visually stunning and tragically fated, this will be a familiar yet interesting adaptation for young and old fans of the Bard. Find out more at  imdb.com  Presented as part of the Bath Film Festival.    With live piano accompaniment from Lillian Henley.  Chapel Arts Centre, Bath   Link

8 November

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  With live accompaniment by Stephen Horne.  Duke of Yorks Picture House, Brighton Link

9 November

The_Battle_of_the_Somme_film_image2Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from  The Works’ (community/ youth) orchestra conducted by Steve Cook.  Holy Trinity Church, Formby Liverpool   Link

10 November

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from  Chichester University Orchestra.  Chapel of the Ascension, Bishop Otter Campus University of Chichester, West Sussex.  Link

11 November

The_Phantom_of_the_Opera_(1925_film)Phantom Opera - Lon Chaney1Phantom Of The Opera (Dir. Rupert Julian, 1925)  (Screening format – not known, 103mins)  A title that needs no introduction, ‘The Phantom of the Opera’ has spawned many remakes, remasters and sequels. This original film version, produced with moments of early Technicolour, sees Lon Chaney, the ‘Man of a Thousand Faces’ perform one of his most iconic roles. His ghastly make-up and outrageous performance made this title a benchmark in the American silent film era. The film was a critical and commercial success upon release, and still stands as an important film in cinematic history to this day, with press quotes from the time labelling the film an ‘ultra-fantastic melodrama’ (New York Times), ‘produced on a stupendous scale’ (Moving Picture World) and ‘probably the greatest inducement to nightmare that has yet been screened’ (Variety).  The mysterious phantom (Lon Chaney) is a vengeful composer living in the catacombs under the Paris Opera House, determined to promote the career of  the singer he loves (Mary Philbin).  Famed for the phantom’s shock unmasking, incredible set designs and the masked ball sequence, it still packs a punch. Find out more at Wikipedia. With live musical accompaniment by acclaimed musicians Minima. Quorn Village Hall, Quorn, Leicestershire  Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from the Sutton Youth Symphony Orchestra    St Andrew’s Church, Cheam Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from the Glasgow Studio Orchestra conducted by Iain Massey.  Glasgow Film Theatre, Glasgow  Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia   Presented by the Fleapit Cinema Club.   Accompanied live by Stephen Horne and Martin Pyne performing the original 1916 score. The screening will be introduced by Dr Toby Haggith of the Imperial War Museum.  Westerham Hall, Westerham, Kent  Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  With recorded soundtrack.  John Peel Centre Cinema, Stowmarket, Suffolk.  Link

12 November

wings-poster-2WINGS, classic DVD

NB    THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED     Link

  Wings – (Dir. William A Wellman, 1927) (Screening format – Not Known) Two young men (Charles ‘Buddy’ Rogers and Richard Arlen) fall in love with the same same girl (Clara Bow). After the US enters WWI, both join the Air Corps and become aces. They remain friends, but their rivalry for the girl threatens their comradeship.  Based upon a simple plot premise, Wings was acclaimed for its technical prowess and realism upon release, with the film becoming the yardstick against which future aviation films were measured, mainly because of its realistic air-combat sequences. It went on to win the first Academy Award for best picture, the only silent film ever to do so.  Director Wellman was hired in part because he was the only director in Hollywood at the wings-6time who had World War I combat pilot experience.  Hundreds of extras were brought in to shoot the picture, and some 300 pilots were involved in the filming.  As well as ariel combat, some 3500 troops were brought in for the ground combat scenes.  According to Hollywood legend, when Paramount saw the shooting overrun and budget spiral they sent an executive to complain to Wellman who swiftly told him that he had two options, “a trip home or a trip to the hospital” .  To find out more see silentfilm.org .  With live organ accompaniment by Donald MacKenzie.  Odeon, Leicester Square, London   Link  

Wind_(1928)The Wind (Dir Victor Sjostrom, 1928) (Screening format – not known, 95 mins)  Innocent and naive Letty Mason (Lillian Gish) moves from her Virginia home to Sweet Water on the western prairies to live on the ranch of her cousin Beverly (Edward Earle) , his wife Cora (Dorothy Cumming) and their three children. Letty quickly learns how inhospitable the environment in Sweet Water is, the most obvious feature being the Lilian Gish - The Windincessant wind. But equally inhospitable are the unrefined way the people in Sweet Water live to which she is unaccustomed, and Cora, who believes Letty has come to steal Beverly away from her. As a result, Cora orders Letty out of her and Bev’s house. With no money, Letty is forced to accept one of the marriage proposals she receives, from Lige Hightower (Lars Hanson), a man who she does not love. But greater terrors loom and the incessant wind brings with it the prospect of madness.   Despite being a critical and popular failure on its release, The Wind is now considered a classic, featuring one of Gish’s greatest performances. But it marked the end of an era being the last silent film starring Gish, the last directed by Sjostrom, and the last major silent released by MGM.  Find out more at  silentfilm.org       With live musical accompaniment by Meg Morley.  Guildhall, Litchfield   Link

two-days-b Two Days (aka Dva Dnya) (Dir. Heorhii Stabovyi, 1927) +   The Night Coachman (aka Nochnoj Izvozchik ) (Dir. Heorhii Tasin,   1928 ) (Screening format – not known, 60/54 mins) Two Days  concentrates on a single 48-hour period during the Russian Revolution. The central character, played by Y. E. Samchykovski, is an old servant who staunchly supports the Royal Family. Even when his master is placed in prison and his son is appointed a commissar, the servant remains faithful to the Czarist regime. But when his village is invaded by the White Russian army tragedy makes him re-evaluate his position.  night-coachmanFind out more at  imdb.com In The Night Coachman  Hordii (image, left) the old coachman serves many rich passengers, including a number of officers of the Russian Volunteer army fighting against the Bolsheviks. One day he learns that his only daughter Katia is a member of the Bolshevik-Anarchist underground, and that she is hiding her comrade Borys, with whom she prints Bolshevik proclamations, in the attic. Wanting to protect his daughter from possible arrest, Hordii reveals Borys’ hiding place to the White Army officers but this has unintended consequences.    Find out more at columbia.edu. Both of these newly restored Soviet Ukrainian thrillers feature men caught in the violent maelstrom of revolution and pushed to the brink by all sides. Produced under the auspices of VUFKU, the famous All-Ukrainian Photo-Film Administration, the films are notable for a masterful cinematography of chiaroscuro and a complex presentation of revolution devoid of triumphalism — but replete with dread.  Presented as part of the Ninth Annual Cambridge Festival of Ukranian Film.  Winstanley Theatre, Trinity College, Cambridge.     Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from the Edinburgh Film Music Orchestra conducted by Yati Durant.   Reid Concert Hall, Edinburgh University, Edinburgh Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from the  Stockport Symphony Orchestra conducted by Wynn Davies.   Stockport Town Hall, Stockport   Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from the   Westbourne Orchestral Society conducted by Lee Marchant.   Pavilion Dance South West Bournemouth   Link

13 November

napoleon 3napoleon-portraitNapoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) Gance’s epic biopic of Napoleon traces his career from his schooldays (where a snowball fight is staged like a military campaign), his flight from Corsica, through the French Revolution (where a real storm is intercut with a political storm) and the Terror, culminating in his triumphant invasion of Italy in 1797.  The film ends here because it was intended to be part one of six, but Gance was unable to raise the money to make further episodes. The film’s legendary reputation is due to the astonishing range of techniques that Gance uses to tell his story ( including fast cutting, extensive close-ups, hand-held camera shots, location shooting, point of view shots, multiple camera set-ups, multiple exposure, superimposition and under water shots) culminating in the final twenty-minute triptych sequence, which alternates widescreen panoramas with complex multiple- image montages.  This is the most complete version of the film available, compiled by Academy Award-winning film-maker, archivist and historian Kevin Brownlow who napoleon-panoramaspent over 50 years tracking down surviving prints from archives around the world since he first saw a 9.5mm version as a schoolboy in 1954.  Find out more at  BFI and  Wikipedia With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   Screening at Picturehouse Cinemas in: London (Central, Crouch End, Greenwich, Hackney, East Dulwich, Brixton and Clapham), Southampton, York, Exeter, Edinburgh, Cambridge, Norwich, Liverpool, Oxford, Bath and Bradford Link

napoleon-panoramaNapoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) For film details, see above.  With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   BFI Southbank, London  Link

Napoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) For film details, see above.  With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.  Queen’s Film Theatre, Belfast    Link

Napoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) For film details, see above.  With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.  Curzon Bloomsbury, London  Link

napoleon-panoramaNapoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) For film details, see above.  With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   Barbican, London  (No link yet – please check with venue)

napoleon-panoramaNapoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) For film details, see above.  Presented as part of the Inverness Film Festival .  With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   Eden Court, Inverness Link

Napoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) For film details, see above.  With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.  Presented as part of the Leeds Internatrional Film Festival.   Leeds Town Hall – Victoria Hall, Leeds Link

Napoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) For film details, see above.  With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.  Quad, Derby  Link

Napoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) For film details, see above.  With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.  Tyneside Cinema, Newcastle on Tyne   Link

nosferatuNosferatu  (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922)  (Screening format  – Blu-Ray 2013 Restoration  95 mins)  Unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula. Max Schreck plays the sinister vampire, Count Orlok, traveling across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at Wikipedia.   Live musical accompaniment by Dmytro Morykit  Fingask Castle, Perthshire  No link yet

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented by South West Silents, Imperial War Museum and Curzon Cinema & Arts.    With live musical accompaniment by Stephen Horne (piano/accordian/flute) & Martin Pyne (percussion) playing the original 1916 score.  Curzon Community Cinema, Clevedon Link

battle-of-the-somme 2Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from the Cardiff University Symphony Orchestra conducted by Mark Eager.  St David’s Hall, Cardiff   Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from the Worthing Symphony Orchestra conducted by John Gibbons. Worthing Assembly Hall, Worthing     Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from the Glasgow Studio Orchestra.  Glasgow Film Theatre, Glasgow    Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from the Leeds College of Music Community Orchestra, conducted by Ben Crick.  Royal Armouries, Leeds Link

14 November

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  With recorded soundtrack  Little Theatre Picturehouse, Bath Link

The Restoration of NapoleonWhen film historian Kevin Brownlow first saw Napoleon as a boy, a mere 20 minute section was all he could get his hands on.  Sixty years and several restorations later, we can now screen a version which lasts five and a half hours.  The BFI is delighted to host Kevin Brownlow and film restorer and historian Patrick Stanbury as they share an account of the somewhat troubled past of this monumental film, and celebrate this singular achievement in film restoration.  BFI Southbank, London  (No link yet available – check with venue)

15 November

shadowtraps1webThe Shadow Traps: Louis Le Prince  In 1888, Louis Le Prince shot the world’s first films here in Leeds before disappearing without a trace on 16th September 1890. The Shadow Traps is an illustrated talk on Le Prince, his films and his relationship with Leeds. Presented by Irfan Shah (researcher and co-writer of the documentary The First Film), the talk will present newly discovered material never before seen in public. An engrossing mix of film history, psycho-geography and detective work, The Shadow Traps will shed new light on one of the great Victorian mysteries.  Find out more at nationalmediamuseum.org      Presented as part of the Leeds International Film Festival.  Leeds Town Hall – Albert Room, Leeds  Link

lonesome_posterLonesome (Dir. Paul Lejos, 1928) (Screening format – not known, 69mins)  Lonesome is a lost treasure from Hollywood’s golden age, directed by pioneering explorer-anthropologist-doctor-filmmaker, Paul Fejos. It’s a New York City symphony set in Coney Island during the Fourth of July weekend, with dynamic camera work, experimental editing and an innovative use of colour tinting and superimposition effects. Largely silent, the film was made in the early days of the talkie and has three token dialogue scenes.   Mary is a telephone operator who lives alone and is lonely. Jim is a factory worker who lives alone and is lonely. Each decides to go to the beach  and both are captivated with each other, eventually realizing that they really do like each other. Having gone from loneliness to finding love, enjoying the company of each other and having fun, they are  separated from each other. Only knowing each other’s first name, Jim and Mary are desperate to find each other. Will these two lonesome individuals who have discovered their love for each other…lose it all that same day? Find out more at allmovie.com   Presented as part of the Leeds International Film Festival. With live accompaniment by Simon Lindley on the pipe organ.   Chaple FM, Leeds Link

16 November

maciste-2Maciste in Love (aka Maciste Innamorato) (Dir. Luigi Romano Borgnetto, 1919) +  The Slave of Phidias (aka L’ Esclave de Phidias) (Dir. Léonce Perret, 1917)  (Screening format – 35mm)  Maciste in Love is one of a series of films starring Bartolomeo Pagano as Maciste, the slave with superhuman strength, first seen in the 1914 film Cabiria. 26 sequels followed, with Maciste becoming a character who could appear in any time and place, acting as a propaganda figure in films made during the period of the First World war, and later as a fantasy figure. A further series of sound films appeared between 1960 and 1965, featuring a number of American bodybuilders in the title role.  Find out more at  wikipedia.org  .    In The Slave of Phidias, while the sculpter Phidias attempts to chisel a statue of the goddess of love that remains offscreen and unfinished throughout the film, his slave-girl creates in him a real, passionate love stirred by the beauty of her flesh and, most importantly, of her lyre-playing.    A Kennington Bioscope presentation.  With live piano accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London  Link

17 November

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from  North Lanarkshire Youth Orchestra.  Belshill Academy, North Lanarkshire, Scotland   Link

18 November

robinhood-1922-1Robin Hood (Dir. Allan Dwan, 1922) (Screening format – not known) Amid big-budget medieval pageantry, King Richard (Wallace Beery) goes on the Crusades leaving his brother Prince John (Sam De Grasse)  as regent, who promptly emerges as a cruel, grasping, treacherous tyrant. Apprised of England’s peril by message from his lady-love Marian (Enid Bennett), the dashing Earl of Huntingdon (Douglas Fairbanks) endangers his life and honor by returning to oppose John, but robin-hood-1922-2finds himself and his friends outlawed, and Marian apparently dead. Enter Robin Hood, acrobatic champion of the oppressed, laboring to set things right through swashbuckling feats and cliffhanging perils.  One of the films that shaped the world of Hollywood, Robin Hood had a huge budget, large scale sets and was the first film to have a premiere. Pioneering in its ambitiousness, it is now considered one of the most significant films of early cinema. Douglas Fairbanks as Robin Hood masterfully conquers the athletic stunts of the ‘Swashbuckler’ silent films, whilst managing to bring emotional depth to this defining role. Read more at Wikipedia  Presented by the Lancastrian Theatre Organ Trust. With live organ accompaniment by Donald MacKenzie.  Town Hall Ballroom, Stockport   Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from the   BBC Concert Orchestra conducted by John Gibbons.   Royal Festival Hall, London   Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance of the Laura Rossi score performed by the   Bristol Symphony Orchestra conducted by William Goodchild.  Clifton Cathedral, Bristol  Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia With recorded Laura Rossi score.   Filmhouse, Edinburgh.   Link

19 November

blackmail-specialBlackmail (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1929)    (Screening format – not known, 84mins)   Set at the height of roaring 1920’s London, Blackmail tells the story of Alice White (Anna Ondra), the daughter of a Chelsea shopkeeper. After dinner ends in a quarrel with her boyfriend, Scotland Yard detective Frank Webber (John Longden), Alice finds herself at the centre of her very own crime scene. But with her boyfriend on the case, will Alice’s secret stay hidden and does anyone blackmail_1929_posterelse know about the events of that fateful night..?  Blackmail marked a landmark in British cinema when released in June 1929, hailed as ‘the first British all-talkie film’.  Director Alfred Hitchcock took full advantage of the new technical opportunities which sound offered. But the film was also released in a silent version, and to this day some critics consider this version a superior film. Presented in its original silent form with live musical accompaniment, Blackmail is a wonderful study of all things Hitchcockian: a blonde heroine in jeopardy, a surprise killing, some brilliantly manipulated suspense, and a last-reel chase around a familiar public landmark (in this case, the British Museum).  Find out more at silentfilm.org With live music by Camberwell Community Choir and an 8-piece jazz band. St Giles’ Church, Camberwell, London SE5   Link

Sunrise_vintageSunrise: A Song Of Two Humans (Dir. F W Murnau, 1927) (Screening format – Blu-Ray/DVD) A woman vacationing from the City (Margaret Livingston) lingers in a lakeside town. After dark, she goes to a farmhouse where the Man (George O’Brien) and the Wife (Janet Gaynor) live. She whistles from the fence outside. The Man is torn, but finally departs, leaving his wife with the memories of better times when they were deeply in love. The man and woman kiss passionately. She wants him to sell his farm and join her in the city. Then she suggests that he solve the problem of his wife by drowning her….Considered by some to be the greatest film of the silent era, Sunrise is at very least a combination of artistic triumph and artistic enigma. Perhaps the finest example of the melding of German visual design with American studio production techniques, Sunrise is an oddly disconnected story that still manages to reach its audience with its tremendous emotional undercurrent. Find out more at Wikipedia  With live musical accompaniment by Wurlitza.  Maker-with-Rame Community Hall, Cornwall Link

napoleon1Napoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) Gance’s epic biopic of Napoleon traces his career from his schooldays (where a snowball fight is staged like a military campaign), his flight from Corsica, through the French Revolution (where a real storm is intercut with a political storm) and the Terror, culminating in his triumphant invasion of Italy in 1797.  The film ends here because it was intended to be part one of six, but Gance was unable to raise the money to make further episodes. The film’s legendary reputation is due to the astonishing range of techniques that Gance uses to tell his story ( including fast cutting, extensive close-ups, hand-held camera shots, location shooting, point of view shots, multiple camera set-ups, multiple exposure, superimposition and under water shots) culminating in the final twenty-minute triptych sequence, which alternates widescreen panoramas with complex multiple- image montages.  This is the most complete version of the film available, compiled by Academy Award-winning film-maker, archivist and historian Kevin Brownlow who napoleon-panoramaspent over 50 years tracking down surviving prints from archives around the world since he first saw a 9.5mm version as a schoolboy in 1954.  Find out more at  BFI and  Wikipedia With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   BFI Southbank, London  Link

Buster Keaton shorts (titles to be confirmed) with live organ accompaniment by Andy Quin.  Wurlitzer Hall, The Leisure Centre, WokingLink 

20 November

The_Phantom_of_the_Opera_(1925_film)Phantom Opera - Lon Chaney1Phantom Of The Opera (Dir. Rupert Julian, 1925)  (Screening format – not known, 103mins)  A title that needs no introduction, ‘The Phantom of the Opera’ has spawned many remakes, remasters and sequels. This original film version, produced with moments of early Technicolour, sees Lon Chaney, the ‘Man of a Thousand Faces’ perform one of his most iconic roles. His ghastly make-up and outrageous performance made this title a benchmark in the American silent film era. The film was a critical and commercial success upon release, and still stands as an important film in cinematic history to this day, with press quotes from the time labelling the film an ‘ultra-fantastic melodrama’ (New York Times), ‘produced on a stupendous scale’ (Moving Picture World) and ‘probably the greatest inducement to nightmare that has yet been screened’ (Variety).  The mysterious phantom (Lon Chaney) is a vengeful composer living in the catacombs under the Paris Opera House, determined to promote the career of  the singer he loves (Mary Philbin).  Famed for the phantom’s shock unmasking, incredible set designs and the masked ball sequence, it still packs a punch. Find out more at Wikipedia. With live musical accompaniment by acclaimed musicians Minima. Presented as part of the Magic and Mayhem Festival.  Pound Arts Centre, Corsham, Wiltshire Link

napoleon1Napoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) Gance’s epic biopic of Napoleon traces his career from his schooldays (where a snowball fight is staged like a military campaign), his flight from Corsica, through the French Revolution (where a real storm is intercut with a political storm) and the Terror, culminating in his triumphant invasion of Italy in 1797.  The film ends here because it was intended to be part one of six, but Gance was unable to raise the money to make further episodes. The film’s legendary reputation is due to the astonishing range of techniques that Gance uses to tell his story ( including fast cutting, extensive close-ups, hand-held camera shots, location shooting, point of view shots, multiple camera set-ups, multiple exposure, superimposition and under water shots) culminating in the final twenty-minute triptych sequence, which alternates widescreen panoramas with complex multiple- image montages.  This is the most complete version of the film available, compiled by Academy Award-winning film-maker, archivist and historian Kevin Brownlow who napoleon-panoramaspent over 50 years tracking down surviving prints from archives around the world since he first saw a 9.5mm version as a schoolboy in 1954.  Find out more at  BFI and  Wikipedia With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   Hippodrome Cinema, Bo’ness, Scotland Link

24 November

Irish Film Institute 1916 Centenary Ciné-Concert  (Dir. Various) Marking the centenary of the 1916 Easter Rising, the Irish Film Institute presents a programme of short silent films tracing the history of Anglo-Irish historical and cultural dialogue during the revolutionary period and beyond.  Presented as part of the London Irish Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment by Cormac de Barra, Colm Ó Snodaigh and Rossa Ó Snodaigh.  Barbican, London  Link

intolerance-5Intolerance (Dir. D W Griffith, 1916) (Screening format – not known, 197mins)   Griffith’s epic intercuts between four separate stories about man’s inhumanity to man. In Babylon, pacifist Prince Belshazzar is brought down by warring religious factions. In Judea, the last days of Christ (Howard Gaye) are depicted in the style of a Passion play. In France, Catherine de Medici presides over the slaughter of the intoleranceHuguenots. And in California, a woman (Mae Marsh) pleads for the life of her husband (Robert Harron) when he is sentenced to hang for a murder he did not commit.  Intolerance was made partly in response to criticism of Griffith’s previous film, The Birth of a Nation (1915), which was condemned for its racism and for glorifying the Ku Klux Clan.   However, it was not, as is commonly implied, an apology for the racism of his intolerance-2earlier film. Griffith made clear that the film’s title and overriding themes were meant as a response to those who he felt had been intolerant of him in condemning The Birth of a Nation.   Remarkably sophisticated in some scenes, appallingly naïve in others, Intolerance is a mixed bag dramatically, but  it is also a work of great cinematic skill. The film did poorly on first release, not so much because its continuity was difficult to follow as because it preached a gospel of tolerance and pacifism to a nation preparing to enter World War I.  Find out more at  silentfilm.org .  With live musical accompaniment by Matt Handley.  The Cosy Cinema,   The Concertina Club,  Mexborough, South Yorks.  Link

26 November

annie-laurie-1927_01Annie Laurie (Dir. John S Robertson, 1927) (Screening format – not known, 90mins) A romantic melodrama of feuding in the Scottish highlands between the MacDonald and Campbell clans. Annie Laurie (Lillian Gish) , the annie-laurie-gishgovernor’s daughter, falls in love with Ian MacDonald (Norman Kerry)  and risks her life to prevent a treacherous massacre. This was Gish’s third film at MGM and its poor boxoffice returns marked the beginning of a decline in her career.  The film is also interesting for an early, uncredited appearance by John Wayne.  Find out more at silent-hall-of-fame.org .This screening will be accompanied with a live score by fiddle player Shona Mooney and her band, originally commissioned by Hippodrome Festival of Silent Cinema.  Glasgow Film Theatre, Glasgow   Link

 napoleon1Napoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) Gance’s epic biopic of Napoleon traces his career from his schooldays (where a snowball fight is staged like a military campaign), his flight from Corsica, through the French Revolution (where a real storm is intercut with a political storm) and the Terror, culminating in his triumphant invasion of Italy in 1797.  The film ends here because it was intended to be part one of six, but Gance was unable to raise the money to make further episodes. The film’s legendary reputation is due to the astonishing range of techniques that Gance uses to tell his story ( including fast cutting, extensive close-ups, hand-held camera shots, location shooting, point of view shots, multiple camera set-ups, multiple exposure, superimposition and under water shots) culminating in the final twenty-minute triptych sequence, which alternates widescreen panoramas with complex multiple- image montages.  This is the most complete version of the film available, compiled by Academy Award-winning film-maker, archivist and historian Kevin Brownlow who napoleon-panoramaspent over 50 years tracking down surviving prints from archives around the world since he first saw a 9.5mm version as a schoolboy in 1954.  Find out more at  BFI and  Wikipedia With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   BFI Southbank, London  Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)   For film details see 4 Nov above.   Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.    Accompanied by a live performance from the  Hull Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Andrew Penny MBE.   Hull City Hall, Hull   Link

27 November

napoleon1Napoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins) Gance’s epic biopic of Napoleon traces his career from his schooldays (where a snowball fight is staged like a military campaign), his flight from Corsica, through the French Revolution (where a real storm is intercut with a political storm) and the Terror, culminating in his triumphant invasion of Italy in 1797.  The film ends here because it was intended to be part one of six, but Gance was unable to raise the money to make further episodes. The film’s legendary reputation is due to the astonishing range of techniques that Gance uses to tell his story ( including fast cutting, extensive close-ups, hand-held camera shots, location shooting, point of view shots, multiple camera set-ups, multiple exposure, superimposition and under water shots) culminating in the final twenty-minute triptych sequence, which alternates widescreen panoramas with complex multiple- image montages.  This is the most complete version of the film available, compiled by Academy Award-winning film-maker, archivist and historian Kevin Brownlow who napoleon-panoramaspent over 50 years tracking down surviving prints from archives around the world since he first saw a 9.5mm version as a schoolboy in 1954.  Find out more at  BFI and  Wikipedia With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   BFI Southbank, London  Link

Napoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins)  .  For film details see above.  With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   Regent Street Cinema, London   Link

napoleon-panoramaNapoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins)  . For film details see above. With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   Cine Lumiere, Institut Francais,  London Link

Vampyr1932Vampyr (Dir. Carl Theodore Dreyer, 1932)  (Screening format – not known, 75mins) (Technically, Dryer’s first sound film but with very little dialogue and extensive use made of inter-titles) Staying at a country inn, Allan Grey scoffs at the notion of supernatural death before being forced to believe that there may be things beyond his understanding. The skills of director and cameraman induce a similar confusion on the part of those watching, as we encounter one of cinema’s great nightmares. Dreyer offers few explanations for the phenomena on screen:  strange and frightening things may just happen. Vampyr  opened to a generally negative reception from audiences and critics. Dreyer edited the film after its German premiere and it opened to more mixed opinions at its French debut. The film was long considered a low point in Dreyer’s career, but modern critical reception to the film has become much more favorable with critics praising the film’s disorienting visual effects and atmosphere. Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Cinecity Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment by Minima and Stephen Horne.   Duke of York’s Picture House, Brighton  Link

28 November

kid-poster kid-chaplinThe Kid   (Dir. Charlie Chaplin, 1921)  + The Scarecrow  (Dir. Edward F Cline/Buster Keaton, 1920) (Screening format – DVD, 53/19 mins)  The Kid is Chaplin’s first feature length film and a masterful blending of comic genius and sentimentality.   In the film,  Edna Purviance deposits her new baby with a pleading note in a limousine and goes off to commit suicide. The limo is stolen by thieves who dump the baby by a garbage can. Charlie the Tramp finds the baby and makes a home for him. Five years later Edna has become an opera star but does charity work for slum youngsters in hope of finding her boy. Will Edna find the child and will the little tramp get the girl?  As Chaplin says,  “A comedy with a smile–and perhaps a tear” .  Find out more at imdb.com .    In The Scarecrow,  Buster plays a farmhand who competes with Joe Roberts to win scarecrow_1920the love of the farmer’s daughter  (Sybil Seely).    Running from a dog,  Buster falls into a hay thresher and scarecrow-newruins his clothes. Forced to borrow the clothes of a nearby scarecrow, Sybil believes Buster to be proposing as she stumbles upon him tying his shoe. The couple speed off on a motorcycle with Joe and the farmer (played by Buster’s father, Joe) in hot pursuit. Stand by for one of the funniest marriage ceremonies in cinema history.  Find out more at   busterkeaton.com    With live organ accompaniment  by renowned organist Donald MacKenzie.  Alexandra Palace, London N22  Link

29 November

nosferatuposterNosferatu (F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 93mins) Based upon Bram Stoker’s Dracula, one of the most evocative texts in popular culture, FW Murnau’s 1922 film adaptation relocates the story from Transylvania to nineteenth-century Bremen. Max Schreck stars as the terrifying Count Orlock, who thirsts for the body and soul of a young clerk and his beautiful wife. Regarded as the first vampire film, Nosferatu is one of the most artistically original and masterfully ghoulish of the genre.  Find out more at modernism.research.yale.edu  With live musical accompaniment by Paul Robinson’s six piece HarmonieBand (featuring piano, clarinet, accordion, saxophone, percussion and cello).  Colchester Arts Centre, Colchester, Essex  Link

silent_wondersWunder der Schöpfung (akaWonder of Creation) (Dir. Hanns Walter Kornblum, 1925)  (Screening format – not known, 92mins)  This ground-breaking silent documentary is an extraordinary and unique document outlining human knowledge about the world and the universe in the 1920s. Fifteen special effects experts and nine cameramen were involved in the production of this beautifully tinted and toned film which combines documentary scenes, historical documents, fiction elements, animation scenes and educational impact.  Hailed as ‘the nearest we have to a silent forerunner of 2001: A Space Odyssey’ (Bryony Dixon, BFI)  Find out more at  filmmuseum.com  With live performance by acclaimed electronic/acoustic/jazz duo Herschel 36  (Stu Brown and Paul Harrison) of a HippFest commissioned score.  Glasgow Film Theatre, Glasgow   Link

30 November

Napoleon (Dir. Abel Gance, 1927) (Screening format – DCP332 mins)  . For film details see 27 November above. With recorded Carl Davies orchestral accompaniment.   Cine Lumiere, Institut Francais,  London Link

 


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