London and the South East

F._W._Murnau-Sunrise-Gaynor_and_O'Brien_on_Farmhara kiri iribePandora's BoxOrchids and Ermine Coleen Moore and 6 year old Mickey Rooney

 

 

 

 

 

2 September

Laurel & Hardy Shorts  (Titles TBC) (Screening format – not known) Presented as part of the Peckham and Nunhead Free Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment by Neil Brand.     Peckham, London   Link

3 September

steamboat billSteamboat Bill Jr   ( (Dir. Buster Keaton, 1928)  (Screening format – not known, 71mins)     In Steamboat Bill Jr a crusty river boat captain hopes that his long departed son’s return will help him compete with a business rival.  Unfortunately, William Canfield Jnr (Buster Keaton) is an effete college boy.  Worse still, he has fallen for the business rival’s daughter (Marion Byron).  Not a commercial success at the time, this is now rightly regarded as a Keaton classic.    Find out more at Wikipedia         With live organ accompaniment  by Donald MacKenzie. Odeon, Leicester Square, London Link

5 September

battle-of-the-ancre-01The Battle of the Ancre and the Advance of the Tanks  (  Dir British Topical Committee for War Films/Camera operators Geoffrey H Malins and J B McDowell,  1917) (Screening format – DCP)  This little-known masterpiece of British non-fiction cinema documents the winter stages of the Somme campaign on the Western Front. Including the first ever scenes of tanks in battle, The Battle of the Ancre conveys – with power and artistry – the difficulties experienced by the British Army as it fought doggedly on through a sea of mud.  With recorded Laura Rossi score.  Introduced by Dr Toby Haggith, IWM. BFI Southbank, London Link

6 September

better-ole-01Funny Bones: the Black Comedy of the War  Very few comedy films from the World War One period survive, but humour is (as is often noted), ironically, more essential the darker times become. Comedy changed over the course of the war from the xenophobic gibes of the early cartoon films to a more irreverent comedy focused on the common soldier – such as Bruce Bairnsfather’s ‘Old Bill’ and Chaplin’s ‘slacker’ in Shoulder Arms. Home-grown comedies feature some Land Girls dealing with a man shortage and Lupino Lane dodging the draft.  With live piano accompaniment by Cyrus Gabrysch.  Introduced by Bryony Dixon, BFI. BFI Southbank, London  View

7 Septemberpampered-youth-1925

An Evening of Vitagraph 9.5mm films from Kevin Brownlow’s personal collection  –  Part 2 (Screening format – 9.5mm)  Back in June noted film historian Kevin Brownlow came along to the Cinema Museum to show a number of Vitagraph 9.5mm films from his own collection.  Sadly there wasn’t time to screen all the films he brought along so Kevin is back again tonight to show as many more as time allows, including a 1924 version of THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS (aka Pampered Youth).  A Kennington Bioscope presentation with live piano accompaniment.  The Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London Link

8 September

menilmontant7Menilmontant  (Dir. Dimitri Kirsanoff, 1926) (Screening format – not known, 38mins)  A couple is brutally murdered in the working-class district of Paris. Later on, the narrative follows the lives of their two daughters (Nadia Sibirskaïa and Yolande Beaulieu), both in love with a Parisian thug (Guy Belmont) and leading them to separate ways.   Kirsanoff’s second film, Menilmontant is also his bestmenilmontant3 known.  Kirsanoff not only directed, but co-photographed, edited, and produced the film for his own company. Menilmontant was filmed during the winter of 1924-25, primarily on location in Menilmontant, a poor working class suburb on the eastern edge of Paris which gives the film its name.  Menilmontant has been described as “une oevre presque parfaite” (“a nearly perfect work”) . Its story is told entirely in images, without the use of explanatory intertitles; Kirsanoff was among the very rare filmmakers of the silent era to attempt this. The film makes use of techniques such as montage, hand-held camera, ultra-rapid montage, and superposition.  For more info see seul-le-cinema.blogspot.co.uk   With live piano accompaniment from Stephen Horne.  BFI Southbank, London Link

9 September

Silent film evening    Film titles to be confirmed. Live organ accompaniment by renowned organist Donald MacKenzie  United Reformed Church, Guildford Link

10 September

Silent film evening    Film titles to be confirmed. Live organ accompaniment by renowned organist Donald MacKenzie  St Mary & St Gile’s Church, Stony Stratford Link

11 September

battle-of-the-ancre-01The Battle of the Ancre and the Advance of the Tanks  (  Dir British Topical Committee for War Films/Camera operators Geoffrey H Malins and J B McDowell,  1917) (Screening format – DCP, 76mins)  This little-known masterpiece of British non-fiction cinema documents the winter stages of the Somme campaign on the Western Front. Including the first ever scenes of tanks in battle, The Battle of the Ancre conveys – with power and artistry – the difficulties experienced by the British Army as it fought doggedly on through a sea of mud.  With recorded Laura Rossi score.  Introduced by Dr Toby Haggith, IWM. BFI Southbank, London Link

14 September

mating callThe Mating Call (Dir. James Cruze, 1928) (Screening format – not known, 72 mins) Farmer turned WWI hero Leslie returns home hoping to reunite with his wife Rose, but it turns out her parents had the unconsummated marriage annulled so she could wed the rich Lon Henderson. Rose throws herself at Leslie, itching for an affair due to her mating call 1928husband’s penchant for infidelity, but he spurns her, marrying a young French immigrant named Catherine to get her off his back. When one of Lon’s lovers commits suicide after he has cast her aside, he pins it all on Les and has his KKK-inspired group take action against him…Find out more at  wikipedia.org    A Kennington Bioscope presentation.  With live piano accompaniment.  The Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London Link

17 September

one-week- Buster KeatonNeighbours (Dir.  Edward F Cline/Buster Keaton  1920) + One Week (Dir.  Edward F Cline/Buster Keaton, 1920) (Screening format – not known, 18 /19mins)  In Neighbours, Buster Keaton and Virginia Fox play young lovers who live in tenements, the rear of which face each other, with backyards separated by a wooden fence. Their families feud over the lovers’ relationship, resulting in much mayhem and slapstick.  Find out more at  Wikipedia.org   One Week sees newlyweds Buster Keaton and Sybil Seely trying to build a kit house, hampered by a rejected suitor who has secretly re-numbered all the crates.   Find out more at Wikipedia.org   Presented as part of the Herts Jazz FILM Festival with live musical accompaniment by renowned jazz pianist David Newton.    Garden City Cinema, Welwyn Garden City   Link

 

19 September

Passion of joan of arc 1The Passion of Joan of Arc (Dir. Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1928) (Screening format – not known, 82 mins) In 1926 Danish film director Dreyer was invited to make a film in France by the Société Générale des Films and chose to direct a picture about Joan of Arc due to her renewed popularity (having been canonised as a saint of the Roman Catholic Church in 1920 and subsequently adopted as one of the patron saints of France). Apparently discarding a script provided by the Société, Dreyer spent over a year researching Joan of Arc including study of the actual transcripts passion of joan of arc 2of her trial before producing a script of his own.  In the title role, Dreyer cast the little known stage actress Renee Jeanne Falconetti, who had previously acted in just two inconsequential films, both in 1917.  The film focuses on the trial and eventual execution of Joan of Arc after she is captured by the English.  Although not a popular success at the time, the film attracted immediate critical praise.  The New York Times critic wrote “… … as a film work of art this takes precedence over anything that has so far been produced. It makes worthy pictures of the past look like tinsel shams. It fills one with such passion of joan of arc 3intense admiration that other pictures appear but trivial in comparison.”  Falconetti’s performance has been widely lauded with critic Pauline Kael writing in 1982 that Falconetti’s portrayal “may be the finest performance ever recorded on film.”  The film was subsequently re-edited against Dreyer’s wishes and his original version was long thought lost.  But in 1981 a near perfect copy was found in the attic of a psychiatric hospital in Oslo.  The Passion of Joan of Arc now regularly appears in ‘Top Ten’ lists not just of best silent films but best films of all time.  Find out more at  rogerebert.com  The film will be accompanied by a new score written specifically for this screening by Adrian Utley (Portishead) and Will Gregory (Goldfrapp) and performed by them and an eclectic group of musicians on electric guitars, percussion, horns, harp and synthesizers together with members of the  Monteverdi Choir.  Globe Theatre, Southwark, London Link

verdun-01Verdun (Dir. Léon Poirier, 1928) (Screening format – 35mm,  151mins)  This French battle reconstruction, filmed over the best part of a year at Verdun itself, is one of the best films to be made in the immediate aftermath of World War One. An accurate blend of dramatised scenes – many of the cast were war veterans – and real footage from the long and bloody battle in 1916, it’s the French equivalent of the British Somme films.  For more detail see   wikipedia.org   With live piano accompaniment from Costas Fotopoulos.  BFI Southbank, London View

20 September

lost-genre-of-the-battle-film-01The Lost Genre of the Battle Film  Immediately after the war, as monuments were erected in towns and villages up and down the country, the film industry too began to tell the stories of the war as part of the greater memorialising process. One little known sub-genre is the battle reconstruction film, with  extracts from rarely seen films from the BFI National Archive including Mons, Ypres, Zeebrugge, and Somme. With live piano accompaniment by John Sweeney.  Introduced by Dr Lawrence Napper .  BFI Southbank, London  Link

24 September

verdun-01Verdun (Dir. Léon Poirier, 1928) (Screening format – 35mm,  151mins)  This French battle reconstruction, filmed over the best part of a year at Verdun itself, is one of the best films to be made in the immediate aftermath of World War One. An accurate blend of dramatised scenes – many of the cast were war veterans – and real footage from the long and bloody battle in 1916, it’s the French equivalent of the British Somme films.  For more detail see   wikipedia.org   With live piano accompaniment from Stephen Horne.  BFI Southbank, London View

CC_The_Immigrant_1917Chaplin’s South London + The Immigrant (Dir. Charles Chaplin, 1917) (Screening format – not known, 22 mins) Starting at the Cinema Museum, this event will retrace the steps of local boy Charles Chaplin, ending up at his boyhood home in Kennington. One of Chaplin’s childhood homes is at 39 Methley Street. The Order of Water Rats put a commemorative plaque there. When Chaplin was expelled from the United States in 1952 for his supposed Communist beliefs, his tramp character kicking an immigration officer up the behind in The Immigrant was cited as evidence of his anti-Americanism. This film will be screened near to Chaplin’s commemrative plaque, with a live musical accompaniment.  In   The Immigrant the little Tramp (Chaplin) is on a  steamer crossing the Atlantic.  He  finds himself in assorted mischief while, among other things, playing cards, eating in a mess hall, and avoiding seasick passengers. He befriends another immigrant (Edna Purviance) who is traveling to America with her ailing mother.  Upon arrival in America, the Tramp and the woman part company. Later, hungry and broke, the tramp finds money on the street.   He enters a restaurant,  orders a meal and is reunited with the woman. But then he discovers the money is gone…  Find out more at IMDb.comStarting at the Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London    Link

25 September

ghostthatneverreturnsThe Ghost That Never Returns (Dir. Abram Room, 1929) + Hell’s Hinges (Dir. Charles Swickard/William S hart, 1916) Screening format – not known, 67/64mins)  In The Ghost That Never Returns, José Real (Boris Ferdinandov), who is serving a life sentence for having led an oilfield workers’ strike,  leads a revolt among the prisoners. The revolt is subdued and the governor recalls the regulation whereby a prisoner who has served ten years is entitled to one day’s liberty and decides to grant this to Real, with the intention that he will be killed at the Hell's_Hingesday’s end for trying to ‘escape’. Real sets out to see his wife and family, warned that no one who has taken this leave has ever made it back alive. On the train, he  is offered food by a man who later proves to be a government agent.  Will Real survive his day of liberty and reach his family or will the governor be rid of this troublemaker for good.  Find out more at jonathanrosenbaum.netHell’s Hinges tells the story of a weak-willed minister, Rev. Bob Henley Jack Standing), who comes to a wild and debauched frontier town with his sister, Faith (Clara Williams). The owner of the saloon, Silk Miller (Alfred Hollingsworth),  encourage the local rowdies to disrupt the attempts to evangelize the community. Which side will hard-bitten gunman Blaze Tracy (William S Hart), the most dangerous man around, take in this dispute and what other tricks does Silk Miller have up his sleeve?  Find out more at  imdb.com  With live musical accompaniment by the Dodge Brothers.  Barbican, London   Link

30 September

The_Battle_of_the_Somme_film_image2Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  The Battle of the Somme gave its 1916 audience an unprecedented insight into the realities of trench warfare, controversially including the depiction of dead and wounded soldiers. It shows scenes of the build-up to the infantry offensive including the massive preliminary bombardment, coverage of the first day of the battle (the bloodiest single day in Britain’s military history) and depictions of the small gains and massive costs of the attack. The Battle of the Somme remains one of the most successful British films ever made. It is estimated over 20 million tickets were sold in Great Britain in the first two months of release, and the film was distributed world-wide to demonstrate to allies and neutrals Britain’s commitment to the First World War. It is the source of many of that conflict’s most iconic images. It was made by British official cinematographers Geoffrey Malins and John McDowell. Though it was not intended as a feature film, once the volume and quality of their footage had been seen in London, the British Topical Committee for War Films decided to compile a feature-length film.  Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.  With live musical accompaniment by The Angel Orchestra conducted by Peter Fender   The Broadway Theatre, Catford  Link


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