September 2016

 

F._W._Murnau-Sunrise-Gaynor_and_O'Brien_on_Farmhara kiri iribePandora's BoxOrchids and Ermine Coleen Moore and 6 year old Mickey Rooney

 

 

 

 

 

2 September

Laurel & Hardy Shorts  (Titles TBC) (Screening format – not known) Presented as part of the Peckham and Nunhead Free Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment by Neil Brand.     Peckham, London   Link

3 September

nosferatuNosferatu  (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922)  (Screening format  – Not Known,   95 mins)  Unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula. Max Schreck plays the sinister vampire, Count Orlok, traveling across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at Wikipedia.   Live musical organ accompaniment.  Halifax Minster, Halifax, Yorkshire. Link

steamboat billSteamboat Bill Jr   ( (Dir. Buster Keaton, 1928)  (Screening format – not known, 71mins)     In Steamboat Bill Jr a crusty river boat captain hopes that his long departed son’s return will help him compete with a business rival.  Unfortunately, William Canfield Jnr (Buster Keaton) is an effete college boy.  Worse still, he has fallen for the business rival’s daughter (Marion Byron).  Not a commercial success at the time, this is now rightly regarded as a Keaton classic.    Find out more at Wikipedia         With live organ accompaniment  by Donald MacKenzie. Odeon, Leicester Square, London Link

5 September

battle-of-the-ancre-01The Battle of the Ancre and the Advance of the Tanks  (  Dir British Topical Committee for War Films/Camera operators Geoffrey H Malins and J B McDowell,  1917) (Screening format – DCP, 76mins)  This little-known masterpiece of British non-fiction cinema documents the winter stages of the Somme campaign on the Western Front. Including the first ever scenes of tanks in battle, The Battle of the Ancre conveys – with power and artistry – the difficulties experienced by the British Army as it fought doggedly on through a sea of mud.  With recorded Laura Rossi score.  Introduced by Dr Toby Haggith, IWM. BFI Southbank, London Link

6 September

better-ole-01Funny Bones: the Black Comedy of the War  Very few comedy films from the World War One period survive, but humour is (as is often noted), ironically, more essential the darker times become. Comedy changed over the course of the war from the xenophobic gibes of the early cartoon films to a more irreverent comedy focused on the common soldier – such as Bruce Bairnsfather’s ‘Old Bill’ and Chaplin’s ‘slacker’ in Shoulder Arms. Home-grown comedies feature some Land Girls dealing with a man shortage and Lupino Lane dodging the draft.  With live piano accompaniment by Cyrus Gabrysch.  Introduced by Bryony Dixon, BFI. BFI Southbank, London  View

7 Septemberpampered-youth-1925

An Evening of Vitagraph 9.5mm films from Kevin Brownlow’s personal collection  –  Part 2 (Screening format – 9.5mm)  Back in June noted film historian Kevin Brownlow came along to the Cinema Museum to show a number of Vitagraph 9.5mm films from his own collection.  Sadly there wasn’t time to screen all the films he brought along so Kevin is back again tonight to show as many more as time allows, including a 1924 version of THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS (aka Pampered Youth).  A Kennington Bioscope presentation with live piano accompaniment.  The Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London Link

Silent Movie Nights (Dir. Various) (Screening format – not known) An evening of silent comedies including Dough and Dynamite (Dir. Charles Chaplin, 1914) – Chaplin and Chester Conklin work as waiters at a restaurant where the cooks go on strike. When the two are forced to work as bakers, the striking cooks put dynamite in the dough, with explosive results. Mabel’s New Hero aka Fatty and the Bathing Beauties (Dir. mack Sennett, 1913) Fatty Arbuckle  rescues Mabel Mystery_Of_The_Leaping_Fish_Cocaine_filled_1916_MovieNormand twice: first, from the unwelcome attentions of a masher, then from a runaway observation balloon.  The Mystery of the Leaping Fish (Dir. John Emerson, 1919) One of the most bizarre and funniest silent films of all times.  Douglas Fairbanks plays detective Coke Ennyday (image left), a cocaine/heroin/alcohol addicted parody of Sherlock Holmes .  Barney Oldfield’s Race for a Life (Dir, Mack Sennett, 1913)  Mabel Normand rejects the advances of a villainous cad who then seizes Mabel and chains her to a railroad track. Mabel’s anxious boyfriend turns for help to the great Barney Oldfield, who jumps in his racing car and speeds to the rescue along with the Keystone Kops.  Presented by Gladstones Bag  with live score and sound effects.  Britannia Panopticon Music Hall,  Glasgow    Link

8 September

menilmontant7Menilmontant  (Dir. Dimitri Kirsanoff, 1926) (Screening format – not known, 38mins)  A couple is brutally murdered in the working-class district of Paris. Later on, the narrative follows the lives of their two daughters (Nadia Sibirskaïa and Yolande Beaulieu), both in love with a Parisian thug (Guy Belmont) and leading them to separate ways.   Kirsanoff’s second film, Menilmontant is also his bestmenilmontant3 known.  Kirsanoff not only directed, but co-photographed, edited, and produced the film for his own company. Menilmontant was filmed during the winter of 1924-25, primarily on location in Menilmontant, a poor working class suburb on the eastern edge of Paris which gives the film its name.  Menilmontant has been described as “une oevre presque parfaite” (“a nearly perfect work”) . Its story is told entirely in images, without the use of explanatory intertitles; Kirsanoff was among the very rare filmmakers of the silent era to attempt this. The film makes use of techniques such as montage, hand-held camera, ultra-rapid montage, and superposition.  For more info see seul-le-cinema.blogspot.co.uk   With live piano accompaniment from Stephen Horne.  BFI Southbank, London Link

9 September

Silent film evening    Film titles to be confirmed. Live organ accompaniment by renowned organist Donald MacKenzie  United Reformed Church, Guildford Link

10 September

Silent film evening    Film titles to be confirmed. Live organ accompaniment by renowned organist Donald MacKenzie  St Mary & St Gile’s Church, Stony Stratford Link

The_Battle_of_the_Somme_film_image2Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  The Battle of the Somme gave its 1916 audience an unprecedented insight into the realities of trench warfare, controversially including the depiction of dead and wounded soldiers. It shows scenes of the build-up to the infantry offensive including the massive preliminary bombardment, coverage of the first day of the battle (the bloodiest single day in Britain’s military history) and depictions of the small gains and massive costs of the attack. The Battle of the Somme remains one of the most successful British films ever made. It is estimated over 20 million tickets were sold in Great Britain in the first two months of release, and the film was distributed world-wide to demonstrate to allies and neutrals Britain’s commitment to the First World War. It is the source of many of that conflict’s most iconic images. It was made by British official cinematographers Geoffrey Malins and John McDowell. Though it was not intended as a feature film, once the volume and quality of their footage had been seen in London, the British Topical Committee for War Films decided to compile a feature-length film.  Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.  With live musical accompaniment by the Cambridge Concert Orchestra conducted by Suzanne Dexter-Mills.    St George’s Church, Cambridge  Link

Burlesque_on_Carmen_posterThe 1916 Cine-Variety Show.    A  recreation of a 1916 historic music hall show, featuring demonstrations by re-enactors, recruitment songs, comedy sketches, silent films and newsreels shown in the Britannia Panopticon during 1916,  including   Burlesque on Carmen (Dir. Charles Chaplin, 1915)  Chaplin’s pastiche on the Carmen story in which Carmen (Edna Purviance), a gypsy seductress is sent to convince Darn Hosiery (Chaplin), the officer in charge of guarding one of the entrances to the city of Sevilla, to allow a smuggling run. She first tries to bribe him but he takes the money and refuses to let the smuggled goods in.  She then invites him to Lillas Pastia’s inn where she seduces him. After a fight at the tobacco factory where Carmen works, he has to arrest her but later lets her escape.  For more information see wikipedia.org  With live musical accompaniment.     Britannia Panopticon Music Hall,  Glasgow   Link

achmedLARGE-1280x480The Adventures of Prince Achmed (Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed) (Dir. Carl Koch and Lotte Reiniger, 1926) (Screening format – not known, 72 mins)   Based on the classic collection of stories “Arabian Nights,” the film tells the story of an evil African sorcerer who tricks a young prince named Achmed into riding a wild magical flying horse which he does not know how to control. The evil sorcerer assumes that the Prince will eventually get thrown from the flying horse and plunge to his death. However, Prince Achmed manages to tame the flying horse and instead gets whisked away into a series of adventures that include encounters with Aladdin, the Witch of the Fiery Mountains, the beautiful Princess Pari Banu and of course a showdown with the evil African sorcerer. This German animated fairy-tale film  is the oldest surviving animated feature film.  It features a silhouette animation technique co-director Reiniger had invented which involved manipulated cutouts made from cardboard and thin sheets of lead under a camera. The technique she used for the camera is similar to Wayang shadow puppets, though hers were animated frame by frame, not manipulated in live action. For more information see methodshop.com  With live musical accompaniment by acoustic trio Sink.  Dundee Contenporary Arts, Scotland Link

High Treason 1929High Treason (Dir. Maurice Elvey, 1924) (Screening format – 35mm, 95 mins) In a future London evil arms dealers plot to blow up the Channel Tunnel and fly planes into tall buildings, driving two super-powers to the brink of war. Can London’s Peace League save the world? The city’s skyline of skyscrapers and bullet-shaped railways may recall Metropolis, but the similarities end there in this very British vision of the future.  It being the future, everyone wears glittering silver lame, dance music is produced by automaton, people communicate by video phone and showers both wash and dry. It’s impressive to see that gender equality is taken for granted and delightful to note that combat gear includes high heels! Based on a play by maverick MP, Noel Pemberton-Billing, the film’s futuristic setting allows for playful debate on the war versus peace issues of the inter-war years.  For more info see  wikipedia.org .  Presented by  Curzon Arts and Cinema and South West Silents with live piano accompaniment by Andy Quin.  With introduction by Lucie Dutton who is currently researching a PhD thesis on Maurice Elvey’s early career.  Curzon Cinema, Clevedon  Link

11 September

battle-of-the-ancre-01The Battle of the Ancre and the Advance of the Tanks  (  Dir British Topical Committee for War Films/Camera operators Geoffrey H Malins and J B McDowell,  1917) (Screening format – DCP, 76mins)  This little-known masterpiece of British non-fiction cinema documents the winter stages of the Somme campaign on the Western Front. Including the first ever scenes of tanks in battle, The Battle of the Ancre conveys – with power and artistry – the difficulties experienced by the British Army as it fought doggedly on through a sea of mud.  With recorded Laura Rossi score.  Introduced by Dr Toby Haggith, IWM. BFI Southbank, London Link

13 September

ThiefofBagdad.4web_originalThe Thief of Bagdad  (Dir.  Raoul Walsh, 1924) (Screening format – not known, 140 mins)  A crafty thief (Douglas Fairbanks) sneaks into the palace of Bagdad, where, passing himself off as a nobleman, he falls in love with the beautiful princess (Julanne Johnston). But thieves can’t simply marry princesses! A test is devised to select a husband from her many suitors; sent away to distant lands, he who finds the rarest treasure can return to marry her. On his journey our hero wanders into the Cavern of Enchanted Trees, meets the Old Man of the Midnight Sea, journeys to the Abode of the Winged Horse, fights monsters and battles the army of the evil King of Ho Sho (Sojin), who will stop at nothing to claim the princess and her fortune! Fairbanks’ incredible athleticism, grace and breathtaking stunts showcase an actor at the height of his career, while this thrilling Action/ Fantasy / Drama launched the career of extraordinary director Raoul Walsh.  Find out more at silentfilm.org   With live piano accompaniment by Forrester Pyke.  Eden Court, Inverness  Link

14 September

mating callThe Mating Call (Dir. James Cruze, 1928) (Screening format – not known, 72 mins) Farmer turned WWI hero Leslie returns home hoping to reunite with his wife Rose, but it turns out her parents had the unconsummated marriage annulled so she could wed the rich Lon Henderson. Rose throws herself at Leslie, itching for an affair due to her mating call 1928husband’s penchant for infidelity, but he spurns her, marrying a young French immigrant named Catherine to get her off his back. When one of Lon’s lovers commits suicide after he has cast her aside, he pins it all on Les and has his KKK-inspired group take action against him…Find out more at  wikipedia.org    A Kennington Bioscope presentation.  With live piano accompaniment.  The Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London Link

rink_posterThe Rink (Dir. Charlie Chaplin, 1916) and The General (Dir. Buster Keaton, 1926) (Screening format – not known, 24/78 mins) In The Rink Charlie Chaplin gets his skates on as a clumsy waiter who causes chaos at the local roller rink. A full century after it was made, the film’s perfectly timed comic choreography never fails to have its audiences in stitches.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  The General sees Buster Keaton go from zero to hero as Johnny Gray, a young man rejected by the Confederate Army who proves his courage by stealing back a train grabbed by Civil War forces from the North. Keaton, who performed his own death-defying stunts, blends slapstick and action to create a silent cinema masterpiece.  Find out more at  silentfilm.org  .  Presented as part of the Kirkcaldy Film Festival.  The Adam Smith Theater, Kirkcaldy, Scotland Link

15 September

waxworks 1924Waxworks (Dir. Paul Leni, 1924) (Screening format – not known.  83 mins)  Described by film historian Lotte Eisner as one of the most genuinely Expressionist films, Waxworks sees a young nameless poet (William Dieterle) enter a wax museum where the proprietor works in the company of his daughter. The proprietor hires the poet to write a back-story for his wax models of Harum al-Rashid (Emil Jannings), Ivan the Terrible (Conrad Veidt), and Jack the Ripper (Werner Krauss) in order to draw an audience to the museum. With the daughter by his side, the poet notices that the arm of Harun al-Rashid is missing and writes a story incorporating the missing arm.  Find out more at IMDb  Presented as part of the Scalarama festival.  With live piano accompaniment by Jonathan Best.  The Holbeck Underground Ballroom , Holbeck, Leeds Link

lodger specialThe Lodger: A Story of the London Fog  (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1927) (Screening format – not known, 80mins) The Lodger was the first film to truly deserve the designation “A Hitchcock Picture”. British matinee idol Ivor Novello plays Jonathan Drew, a quiet, secretive young man who rents a room in a London boarding house. Drew’s arrival coincides with the reign of terror orchestrated by Jack the Ripper. As the film progresses, circumstantial evidence begins to mount, pointing to Drew as the selfsame Ripper. For more info see  wikipedia.org  With live musical accompaniment by Antwerp, plus Lizzy O’Connor (Vocals/Percussion) Gary Bridgewood (Fiddle+Efx) Pete Scott (Cello+Efx) .  Hackney Picture House, London View

16 September

Wunder der Schopfung 2_600Wunder der Schöpfung  (Dir. Hanns Walter Kornblum, 1925)  (Screening format – not known, 92mins)  This ground-breaking silent documentary is an extraordinary and unique document outlining human knowledge about the world and the universe in the 1920s,  literally translated as ‘Wonder of Creation’. Fifteen special effects experts and nine cameramen were involved in the production of this beautifully tinted and toned film which combines documentary scenes, historical documents, fiction elements, animation scenes and educational impact.  Find out more at  filmmuseum.com    With live performance from acclaimed jazz duo Herschel 36 of a electronic/acoustic soundscape score specially commissioned for the 2016 Hippodrome Silent Film Festival . An Tobar, Mull, Scotland Link

17 September

hamlet 1921 aHamlet (Dir. Svend Gade/Heinz Schall, 1921) (Screening format – not known, 110 mins) A unique vision of the cursed Dane, this silent take on Shakespeare’s drama stands the test of time thanks to a unique and brilliant twist. Starring the gorgeous Danish siren Asta Nielsen this adaptation supposes that Hamlet’s inner turmoil centred on having being born a girl, but having to pass incognito as the male heir to the throne. Visually stunning and tragically fated, this will be a familiar yet interesting adaptation for young and old fans of the Bard. Find out more at  imdb.com  A presentation by South West Silents, in collaboration with Film London, The BFI, and the Deutsches Filminstitut.  With live piano accompaniment from Lillian Henley.  The Guildhall, Gloucester.   Link

one-week- Buster KeatonNeighbours (Dir.  Edward F Cline/Buster Keaton  1920) + One Week (Dir.  Edward F Cline/Buster Keaton, 1920) (Screening format – not known, 18 /19mins)  In Neighbours, Buster Keaton and Virginia Fox play young lovers who live in tenements, the rear of which face each other, with backyards separated by a wooden fence. Their families feud over the lovers’ relationship, resulting in much mayhem and slapstick.  Find out more at  Wikipedia.org   One Week sees newlyweds Buster Keaton and Sybil Seely trying to build a kit house, hampered by a rejected suitor who has secretly re-numbered all the crates.   Find out more at Wikipedia.org   Presented as part of the Herts Jazz FILM Festival with live musical accompaniment by renowned jazz pianist David Newton.    Garden City Cinema, Welwyn Garden City   Link

Wunder der Schopfung 2_600Wunder der Schöpfung  (Dir. Hanns Walter Kornblum, 1925)  (Screening format – not known, 92mins)  This ground-breaking silent documentary is an extraordinary and unique document outlining human knowledge about the world and the universe in the 1920s,  literally translated as ‘Wonder of Creation’. Fifteen special effects experts and nine cameramen were involved in the production of this beautifully tinted and toned film which combines documentary scenes, historical documents, fiction elements, animation scenes and educational impact.  Find out more at  filmmuseum.com    With live performance from acclaimed jazz duo Herschel 36 of a electronic/acoustic soundscape score specially commissioned for the 2016 Hippodrome Silent Film Festival . Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee, Scotland  Link

18 September

Wunder der Schopfung 2_600Wunder der Schöpfung  (Dir. Hanns Walter Kornblum, 1925)  (Screening format – not known, 92mins)  This ground-breaking silent documentary is an extraordinary and unique document outlining human knowledge about the world and the universe in the 1920s,  literally translated as ‘Wonder of Creation’. Fifteen special effects experts and nine cameramen were involved in the production of this beautifully tinted and toned film which combines documentary scenes, historical documents, fiction elements, animation scenes and educational impact.  Find out more at  filmmuseum.com    With live performance from acclaimed jazz duo Herschel 36 of a electronic/acoustic soundscape score specially commissioned for the 2016 Hippodrome Silent Film Festival . Filmhouse, Edinburgh, Scotland   Link

 19 September

Passion of joan of arc 1The Passion of Joan of Arc (Dir. Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1928) (Screening format – not known, 82 mins) In 1926 Danish film director Dreyer was invited to make a film in France by the Société Générale des Films and chose to direct a picture about Joan of Arc due to her renewed popularity (having been canonised as a saint of the Roman Catholic Church in 1920 and subsequently adopted as one of the patron saints of France). Apparently discarding a script provided by the Société, Dreyer spent over a year researching Joan of Arc including study of the actual transcripts passion of joan of arc 2of her trial before producing a script of his own.  In the title role, Dreyer cast the little known stage actress Renee Jeanne Falconetti, who had previously acted in just two inconsequential films, both in 1917.  The film focuses on the trial and eventual execution of Joan of Arc after she is captured by the English.  Although not a popular success at the time, the film attracted immediate critical praise.  The New York Times critic wrote “… … as a film work of art this takes precedence over anything that has so far been produced. It makes worthy pictures of the past look like tinsel shams. It fills one with such passion of joan of arc 3intense admiration that other pictures appear but trivial in comparison.”  Falconetti’s performance has been widely lauded with critic Pauline Kael writing in 1982 that Falconetti’s portrayal “may be the finest performance ever recorded on film.”  The film was subsequently re-edited against Dreyer’s wishes and his original version was long thought lost.  But in 1981 a near perfect copy was found in the attic of a psychiatric hospital in Oslo.  The Passion of Joan of Arc now regularly appears in ‘Top Ten’ lists not just of best silent films but best films of all time.  Find out more at  rogerebert.com  The film will be accompanied by a new score written specifically for this screening by Adrian Utley (Portishead) and Will Gregory (Goldfrapp) and performed by them and an eclectic group of musicians on electric guitars, percussion, horns, harp and synthesizers together with members of the  Monteverdi Choir.  Globe Theatre, Southwark, London Link

Wunder der Schopfung 2_600Wunder der Schöpfung  (Dir. Hanns Walter Kornblum, 1925)  (Screening format – not known, 92mins)  This ground-breaking silent documentary is an extraordinary and unique document outlining human knowledge about the world and the universe in the 1920s,  literally translated as ‘Wonder of Creation’. Fifteen special effects experts and nine cameramen were involved in the production of this beautifully tinted and toned film which combines documentary scenes, historical documents, fiction elements, animation scenes and educational impact.  Find out more at  filmmuseum.com    With live performance from acclaimed jazz duo Herschel 36 of a electronic/acoustic soundscape score specially commissioned for the 2016 Hippodrome Silent Film Festival . Science Centre, Glasgow, Scotland Link

verdun-01Verdun (Dir. Léon Poirier, 1928) (Screening format – 35mm,  151mins)  This French battle reconstruction, filmed over the best part of a year at Verdun itself, is one of the best films to be made in the immediate aftermath of World War One. An accurate blend of dramatised scenes – many of the cast were war veterans – and real footage from the long and bloody battle in 1916, it’s the French equivalent of the British Somme films.  For more detail see   wikipedia.org   With live piano accompaniment from Costas Fotopoulos.  BFI Southbank, London View

20 September

Metropolis22Metropolis (Dir. Fritz Lange, 1927) (Screening format –DVD Jan ’05 version,  118 minutes)  Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder (Gustav Frohlich), the wealthy son of the city’s ruler, and Maria (Brigitte Helm), a poor worker, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes of their city. Filming took place in 1925 at a cost of approximately five million Reichmarks, making it the most expensive film ever released up to that point. It is regarded as a pioneering work of science fiction and is among the most influential films of all time.  Find out more at silentfilm.org   With live musical accompaniment by Dmytro Morykit.  Masham Town Hall, Masham, N Yorks   Link

lost-genre-of-the-battle-film-01The Lost Genre of the Battle Film  Immediately after the war, as monuments were erected in towns and villages up and down the country, the film industry too began to tell the stories of the war as part of the greater memorialising process. One little known sub-genre is the battle reconstruction film, with  extracts from rarely seen films from the BFI National Archive including Mons, Ypres, Zeebrugge, and Somme. With live piano accompaniment by John Sweeney.  Introduced by Dr Lawrence Napper .  BFI Southbank, London  Link

21 September

British Silent Film Night  An evening celebrating British Silents and particularly the work of British Film Studios. Expect a wide range of clips plus a main feature.  Presented by South West Silents.  Introduced by Barbara Gallati.  The Lansdown Pub, Clifton, Bristol  Link

23 September

Silent film evening    Film titles to be confirmed. Live organ accompaniment by renowned organist Donald MacKenzie St Paul’s Church, Royton  Link

24 September

verdun-01Verdun (Dir. Léon Poirier, 1928) (Screening format – 35mm,  151mins)  This French battle reconstruction, filmed over the best part of a year at Verdun itself, is one of the best films to be made in the immediate aftermath of World War One. An accurate blend of dramatised scenes – many of the cast were war veterans – and real footage from the long and bloody battle in 1916, it’s the French equivalent of the British Somme films.  For more detail see   wikipedia.org   With live piano accompaniment from Stephen Horne.  BFI Southbank, London View

CC_The_Immigrant_1917Chaplin’s South London + The Immigrant (Dir. Charles Chaplin, 1917) (Screening format – not known, 22 mins) Starting at the Cinema Museum, this event will retrace the steps of local boy Charles Chaplin, ending up at his boyhood home in Kennington. One of Chaplin’s childhood homes is at 39 Methley Street. The Order of Water Rats put a commemorative plaque there. When Chaplin was expelled from the United States in 1952 for his supposed Communist beliefs, his tramp character kicking an immigration officer up the behind in The Immigrant was cited as evidence of his anti-Americanism. This film will be screened near to Chaplin’s commemrative plaque, with a live musical accompaniment.  In   The Immigrant the little Tramp (Chaplin) is on a  steamer crossing the Atlantic.  He  finds himself in assorted mischief while, among other things, playing cards, eating in a mess hall, and avoiding seasick passengers. He befriends another immigrant (Edna Purviance) who is traveling to America with her ailing mother.  Upon arrival in America, the Tramp and the woman part company. Later, hungry and broke, the tramp finds money on the street.   He enters a restaurant,  orders a meal and is reunited with the woman. But then he discovers the money is gone…  Find out more at IMDb.comStarting at the Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London    Link

25 September

King_John_1899Play On! Shakespeare in Silent Film (Dir. Various) (Screening format – DCP, 90mins) Adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays proved popular with early film-makers and audiences alike, from King John in 1899.  By the end of the silent era around 300 such films had been shakespeareproduced.  This feature-length celebration from the BFI National Archive draws together a delightful selection of thrilling, dramatic, iconic and humorous scenes from two dozen different titles, many of which have been unseen for decades, newly restored and digitised.  See Hamlet addressing Yorick’s skull, King Lear battling a raging storm at Stonehenge, the Merchant of Venice in vibrant stencil colour, the fairy magic of A Midsummernight’s Dream and what was probably John Gielgud’s first appearance on film in the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet.   Ultimate Picture Palace, Oxford Link

ghostthatneverreturnsThe Ghost That Never Returns (Dir. Abram Room, 1929) + Hell’s Hinges (Dir. Charles Swickard/William S hart, 1916) Screening format – not known, 67/64mins)  In The Ghost That Never Returns, José Real (Boris Ferdinandov), who is serving a life sentence for having led an oilfield workers’ strike,  leads a revolt among the prisoners. The revolt is subdued and the governor recalls the regulation whereby a prisoner who has served ten years is entitled to one day’s liberty and decides to grant this to Real, with the intention that he will be killed at the Hell's_Hingesday’s end for trying to ‘escape’. Real sets out to see his wife and family, warned that no one who has taken this leave has ever made it back alive. On the train, he  is offered food by a man who later proves to be a government agent.  Will Real survive his day of liberty and reach his family or will the governor be rid of this troublemaker for good.  Find out more at jonathanrosenbaum.netHell’s Hinges tells the story of a weak-willed minister, Rev. Bob Henley Jack Standing), who comes to a wild and debauched frontier town with his sister, Faith (Clara Williams). The owner of the saloon, Silk Miller (Alfred Hollingsworth),  encourage the local rowdies to disrupt the attempts to evangelize the community. Which side will hard-bitten gunman Blaze Tracy (William S Hart), the most dangerous man around, take in this dispute and what other tricks does Silk Miller have up his sleeve?  Find out more at  imdb.com  With live musical accompaniment by the Dodge Brothers.  Barbican, London   Link

26 September

King_John_1899Play On! Shakespeare in Silent Film (Dir. Various) (Screening format – DCP, 90mins) Adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays proved popular with early film-makers and audiences alike, from King John in 1899.  By the end of the silent era around 300 such films had been shakespeareproduced.  This feature-length celebration from the BFI National Archive draws together a delightful selection of thrilling, dramatic, iconic and humorous scenes from two dozen different titles, many of which have been unseen for decades, newly restored and digitised.  See Hamlet addressing Yorick’s skull, King Lear battling a raging storm at Stonehenge, the Merchant of Venice in vibrant stencil colour, the fairy magic of A Midsummernight’s Dream and what was probably John Gielgud’s first appearance on film in the balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet.   Ultimate Picture Palace, Oxford Link

30 September

Sunrise_originalSunrise: A Song Of Two Humans (Dir. F W Murnau, 1927) (Screening format – Blu-Ray/DVD, 95mins)  A  woman vacationing from the city (Margaret Livingston) lingers in a lakeside town. After dark, she goes to a farmhouse where the Man (George O’Brien) and the Wife (Janet Gaynor) live. She whistles from the fence outside. The Man is torn, but finally departs, leaving his wife with the memories of better times when they were deeply in love. The man and woman kiss passionately. She wants him to sell his farm and join her in the city. Then she suggests that he solve the problem of his wife by drowning her….Considered by some to be the greatest film of the silent era, Sunrise is at very least a combination of artistic triumph and artistic enigma. Perhaps the finest example of the melding of German visual design with American studio production techniques, Sunrise is an oddly disconnected story that still manages to reach its audience with its tremendous emotional undercurrent. Find out more at Wikipedia  With live musical accompaniment by Wurlitza.  Village Hall, St Dominick, Cornwall  Link

The_Battle_of_the_Somme_film_image2Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  The Battle of the Somme gave its 1916 audience an unprecedented insight into the realities of trench warfare, controversially including the depiction of dead and wounded soldiers. It shows scenes of the build-up to the infantry offensive including the massive preliminary bombardment, coverage of the first day of the battle (the bloodiest single day in Britain’s military history) and depictions of the small gains and massive costs of the attack. The Battle of the Somme remains one of the most successful British films ever made. It is estimated over 20 million tickets were sold in Great Britain in the first two months of release, and the film was distributed world-wide to demonstrate to allies and neutrals Britain’s commitment to the First World War. It is the source of many of that conflict’s most iconic images. It was made by British official cinematographers Geoffrey Malins and John McDowell. Though it was not intended as a feature film, once the volume and quality of their footage had been seen in London, the British Topical Committee for War Films decided to compile a feature-length film.  Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.  With live musical accompaniment by The Angel Orchestra conducted by Peter Fender   The Broadway Theatre, Catford  Link


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