August 2016

Greta Garbothree bad men olive borden 3louise brooksclara bow

 

 

 


2 August

animals-of-wwi-01The Animals of World War One  (Dir. Various, 1914-18) (Screening format – not known, 90 mins)  Over 16 million animals played a role in the First World War. They were used for transport, communication and companionship. The machine gun made the cavalry charge archaic but horse power was used everywhere – to carry food, water, ammunition and medical supplies to the front. Dogs and pigeons carried messages, canaries detected poisonous gases, cats and dogs were trained to clear the trenches of rats. More unusual animals – including foxes, monkeys, bears and lions – were even kept as pets and mascots. From dogs and pigeons to cats and monkeys – this archive footage shows the roles they played in WWI. Introduced by Matthew Lee, Imperial War Museum and with live piano accompaniment.  BFI Southbank, London   Link

6 August

achmedLARGE-1280x480The Adventures of Prince Achmed (Die Abenteuer des Prinzen Achmed) (Dir. Carl Koch and Lotte Reiniger, 1926) (Screening format – not known, 72 mins)   Based on the classic collection of stories “Arabian Nights,” the film tells the story of an evil African sorcerer who tricks a young prince named Achmed into riding a wild magical flying horse which he does not know how to control. The evil sorcerer assumes that the Prince will eventually get thrown from the flying horse and plunge to his death. However, Prince Achmed manages to tame the flying horse and instead gets whisked away into a series of adventures that include encounters with Aladdin, the Witch of the Fiery Mountains, the beautiful Princess Pari Banu and of course a showdown with the evil African sorcerer. This German animated fairy-tale film  is the oldest surviving animated feature film.  It features a silhouette animation technique co-director Reiniger had invented which involved manipulated cutouts made from cardboard and thin sheets of lead under a camera. The technique she used for the camera is similar to Wayang shadow puppets, though hers were animated frame by frame, not manipulated in live action. For more information see methodshop.com      Florence Arts Centre, Egremont, Cumbria   Link

11 August

wheels-of-war-01The Wheels of War: Transport in WWI  (Dir. various, 1914-18) Screening format – not known, 90 mins)  The movement of men and equipment is a vital part of the logistics of war. Jane Fish of the Imperial War Museum recounts the many and varied methods of transport used on the fighting fronts of WWI. They range from the traditional four-legged varieties to those on rails, wheels, caterpillar tracks and even the latest airborne machines. The planes, trains and automobiles of the 1914-18 war are illustrated in this selection of rare films from the IWM and BFI. Introduced by Jane Fish, Imperial War Museum and with live musical accompaniment.   BFI Southbank, London  Link

12 August

couple-of-down-and-outs-01A Couple of Down and Outs (Dir. Walter Summers, 1923) (Screening format – DCP, 85mins) Walter Summers, British cinema’s best exponent of war pictures, tells the moving story of an unemployed man who recognises his old artillery horse from the battlefields of the First World War as it’s being led off to the knacker’s yard. Man and horse go on the run in a beautifully executed tale of official indifference and individual compassion. Based on a story by William Townend, this is very much the War Horse of its day. The original materials are preserved in the EYE Film Institute Amsterdam. This is a new digital print from the BFI National Archive.  Find out more at  normantaylordotorg.wordpress.com   With live piano accompaniment.  BFI Southbank, London Link

13 August

General.WEBThe General (Dir. Clyde Bruckman/Buster Keaton, 1926) (Screening format – not known, 78 mins) Johnnie (Buster Keaton) loves both his train (“The General”) and, almost as much,  his fiancee Annabelle Lee (Marion Mack) . When the Civil War begins he is turned down for service because he’s more valuable as an engineer. Annabelle thinks it’s because he’s a coward. Union spies capture The General with Annabelle on board. Johnnie must rescue both his loves. At the time of its initial release, The General wasn’t well received by critics and audiences alike but the film has gradually been reevaluated, and is now considered one of the greatest films of all times. Find out more at silentfilm.org  Presented as part of the Black Country pop-up film tour.  With live piano accompaniment by Paul Shallcross.  West Bromwich Town Hall, West Bromwich  Link

14 August

couple-of-down-and-outs-01A Couple of Down and Outs (Dir. Walter Summers, 1923) (Screening format – DCP, 85mins) Walter Summers, British cinema’s best exponent of war pictures, tells the moving story of an unemployed man who recognises his old artillery horse from the battlefields of the First World War as it’s being led off to the knacker’s yard. Man and horse go on the run in a beautifully executed tale of official indifference and individual compassion. Based on a story by William Townend, this is very much the War Horse of its day. The original materials are preserved in the EYE Film Institute Amsterdam. This is a new digital print from the BFI National Archive.  Find out more at  normantaylordotorg.wordpress.com   With live piano accompaniment.  BFI Southbank, London Link

17 August

15th October 1956: Austrian film maker Fritz Lang (1890 - 1976) on his return to Germany after his years in exile. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)Crime Night With Fritz Lang   Fritz Lang loved crime! He loved it too much to be honest, but out of that passion came a number of films which are wonderfully entertaining… many of which were overshadowed by his more celebrated films such as Metropolis (1927) and Die Nibelungen (1924). James Harrison has chosen his all time favourite Lang film and will introduce the film on the night.  A  South West Silents Presentation.  The Lansdown Pub, Clifton, Bristol Link

sunrise-1Sunrise: A Song Of Two Humans (Dir. F W Murnau, 1927) (Screening format – 35mm, 91 mins) A woman vacationing from the City (Margaret Livingston) lingers in a lakeside town. After dark, she goes to a farmhouse where the Man (George O’Brien) and the Wife (Janet Gaynor) live. She whistles from the fence outside. The Man is torn, but finally departs, leaving his wife with the memories of better times when they were deeply in love. The man and woman kiss passionately. She wants him to sell his farm and join her in the city. Then she suggests that he solve the problem of his wife by drowning her…. Considered by some to be the greatest film of the silent era, Sunrise is at very least a combination of artistic triumph and artistic enigma. Perhaps the finest example of the melding of German visual design with American studio production techniques, Sunrise is an oddly disconnected story that still manages to reach its audience with its tremendous emotional undercurrent. At times surreal and dreamlike in its imagery, Sunrise is both thought provoking and lyrical in its portrayal of the human condition and plays with both the light and dark shades of love and life. Find out more at Wikipedia  With recorded orchestral soundtrack.  Phoenix Cinema, Leicester   Link

18 August

Metropolis22Metropolis (Dir. Fritz Lange, 1927) (Screening format –DVD Jan ’05 version,  118 minutes)  Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder (Gustav Frohlich), the wealthy son of the city’s ruler, and Maria (Brigitte Helm), a poor worker, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes of their city. Filming took place in 1925 at a cost of approximately five million Reichmarks, making it the most expensive film ever released up to that point. It is regarded as a pioneering work of science fiction and is among the most influential films of all time. . Find out more at silentfilm.org Screening as part of the Green Man Festival.  Live musical accompaniment by Dmytro Morykit.   Brecon Beacons National Park  Link

cinema-goes-to-war-01The Cinema Goes To War (Dir. various  1914-18) Screening format – DCP, 90 mins) A collection of rare films showing how camera operators documented the conflict.  This selection of films from the BFI and the Imperial War Museum shows how camera operators documented the conflict and how the newly established cinema industry contributed to the war effort. This emerging medium of entertainment became an essential tool of mass communication in the First World War, despite all the obstacles of shortage of film, basic equipment, virulent censorship and a severe tax on the cinemas. Introduced by Toby Haggith, senior curator, Imperial War Museum and Bryony Dixon, curator, BFI National Archive.  BFI Southbank, London   Link

sunrise-1Sunrise: A Song Of Two Humans (Dir. F W Murnau, 1927) (Screening format – 35mm, 91 mins) A woman vacationing from the City (Margaret Livingston) lingers in a lakeside town. After dark, she goes to a farmhouse where the Man (George O’Brien) and the Wife (Janet Gaynor) live. She whistles from the fence outside. The Man is torn, but finally departs, leaving his wife with the memories of better times when they were deeply in love. The man and woman kiss passionately. She wants him to sell his farm and join her in the city. Then she suggests that he solve the problem of his wife by drowning her…. Considered by some to be the greatest film of the silent era, Sunrise is at very least a combination of artistic triumph and artistic enigma. Perhaps the finest example of the melding of German visual design with American studio production techniques, Sunrise is an oddly disconnected story that still manages to reach its audience with its tremendous emotional undercurrent. At times surreal and dreamlike in its imagery, Sunrise is both thought provoking and lyrical in its portrayal of the human condition and plays with both the light and dark shades of love and life. Find out more at Wikipedia  With recorded orchestral soundtrack.  Phoenix Cinema, Leicester   Link

25 August

man-with-a-movie-camera-LARGE-1280x480Man With A Movie Camera  (Dir. Dziga Vertov, 1929) (Screening format – DCP, 68mins)  Part documentary and part cinematic art, this film follows a city in the 1920s Soviet Union throughout the day, from morning to night. Directed by Dziga Vertov, with a variety of complex and innovative camera shots, the film depicts scenes of ordinary daily life in Russia. Vertov celebrates the modernity of the city, with its vast buildings, dense population and bustling industries. While there are no titles or narration, Vertov still naturally conveys the marvels of the modern city.  Find out more at  silentfilm.org  With live musical accompaniment by Deathcount In Silicon Valley.   Prince Charles Cinema, London   Link

27 August

manxmanManxman (Dir.   Alfred Hitchcock,1929) (Screening formatnot known)  Despite their differing backgrounds, fisherman Pete (Carl Brisson) and lawyer Philip (Malcolm Keen) have been life long friends on the Isle of Man. Pete wants to marry Kate (Anny Ondra) , the landlord’s daughter at the local inn, however Kate’s father (Randle Ayrton)  doesn’t think he is good enough. Pete leaves the island to seek his fortune abroad and entrusts Kate to Philip, but they start to be attracted to each other.  This was the last silent film directed by Hitchcock. Find out more at silentfilm.org  With live musical accompaniment on the Wurlitzer organ by David Ivory   Royalty Cinema. Bowness on Windermere   Link

29 August

Buster_keaton_one_week_posterBuster Keaton Short Films  (Dir. Buster Keaton) (Screening format – not known)  A selection of 4 Buster Keaton shorts: The Playhouse, One Week, The Blacksmith and The Balloonatic. These shorts are widely considered to be among Keaton’s finest works, full of breathtakingly creative stunts and guaranteed to make you laugh.  With live organ accompaniment.  Regent Street Cinema, London Link

Das-Cabinet-des-Dr-Caligari-posterThe Cabinet of Dr Caligari (Robert Wiene, 1920) (Screening format – DCP,  77 mins) In the village of Holstenwall, fairground hypnotist Dr Caligari (Werner Krauss) puts on show a somnambulist called Cesare (Conrad Veidt) who has been asleep for twenty three years.  At night, Cesare walks the streets murdering people on the doctor’s orders.  A student (Friedrich Feher) suspects Caligari after a friend is found dead and it transpires that the doctor is the director of a lunatic asylum.  Fueled by the pessimism and gloom of post-war Germany, the sets by Hermann Warm stand unequaled as a shining example of Expressionist design.  Find out more at Wikipedia.org   With live organ accompaniment.  Regent Street Cinema, London   Link

30 August

guns-of-loos-01The Guns of Loos (Dir. Sinclair Hill, 1928) (Screening format – Video, 93 mins)  Lloyd George said of Sinclair Hill’s Guns of Loos, ‘If I had had this film in 1916 it would have been worth a division to me.’ The battle at Loos provides the backdrop to an intense psychological drama about a munitions Guns of Loos (1928)factory owner, whose dictatorial manner and apparent nerves of steel quickly unravel when faced with the horrors of war. The film features one of the best action sequences in British silent cinema.  Also featuring Madeleine Carroll in her first film role.  Find out more at ithankyouarthur.blogspot.co.uk     With a specially commissioned score played live by Stephen Horne.  BFI Southbank, London   Link

 

 


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