London & South East

  1 July

The_Battle_of_the_Somme_film_image2Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  The Battle of the Somme gave its 1916 audience an unprecedented insight into the realities of trench warfare, controversially including the depiction of dead and wounded soldiers. It shows scenes of the build-up to the infantry offensive including the massive preliminary bombardment, coverage of the first day of the battle (the bloodiest single day in Britain’s military history) and depictions of the small gains and massive costs of the attack. The Battle of the Somme remains one of the most successful British films ever made. It is estimated over 20 million tickets were sold in Great Britain in the first two months of release, and the film was distributed world-wide to demonstrate to allies and neutrals Britain’s commitment to the First World War. It is the source of many of that conflict’s most iconic images. It was made by British official cinematographers Geoffrey Malins and John McDowell. Though it was not intended as a feature film, once the volume and quality of their footage had been seen in London, the British Topical Committee for War Films decided to compile a feature-length film.  Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.  With live musical accompaniment by the Berkhamsted Schools Orchestra conducted by Peter Hopkins.  Centenary Theatre, Berkhamsted School, Berkhamsted, Herts  Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  For film details see above.  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.  With live musical accompaniment by the Docklands Sinfonia conducted by Spencer Down.  St Anne’s London E14  Link

6 July

nosferatuNosferatu  (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922)  (Screening format  – Blu-Ray 2013 Restoration  95 mins)  Unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula. Max Schreck plays the sinister vampire, Count Orlok, traveling across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at Wikipedia.   Live musical accompaniment by Dmytro Morykit  Wilton’s Music Hall, London  Link

7 July

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922)  (Screening format  – Blu-Ray 2013 Restoration  95 mins)  Unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula. Max Schreck plays the sinister vampire, Count Orlok, traveling across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at Wikipedia.   Live musical accompaniment by Dmytro Morykit  Wilton’s Music Hall, London  Link

8 July

battle-of-the-somme-01Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – 35mm, 74mins)  The Battle of the Somme gave its 1916 audience an unprecedented insight into the realities of trench warfare, controversially including the depiction of dead and wounded soldiers. It shows scenes of the build-up to the infantry offensive including the massive preliminary bombardment, coverage of the first day of the battle (the bloodiest single day in Britain’s military history) and depictions of the small gains and massive costs of the attack. The Battle of the Somme remains one of the most successful British films ever made. It is estimated over 20 million tickets were sold in Great Britain in the first two months of release, and the film was distributed world-wide to demonstrate to allies and neutrals Britain’s commitment to the First World War. It is the source of many of that conflict’s most iconic images. It was made by British official cinematographers Geoffrey Malins and John McDowell. Though it was not intended as a feature film, once the volume and quality of their footage had been seen in London, the British Topical Committee for War Films decided to compile a feature-length film.  Find out more at Wikipedia With recorded Laura Rossi score. Introduction and Q&A by Toby Haggith, Imperial War Museum, and Bryony Dixon, curator BFI National Archive.  BFI Southbank, London    Link

9 July

SeashellandtheClergyman 4The Seashell and the Clergyman (Dir. Germaine Dulac, 1928) (Screening format – not known, 28 mins)  Dulac was an early feminist filmmaker and leading light in the French Avant-Gard movement and this work is considered to be the first Surrealist film, coming out as it did a full year before Bunuel’s Un Chien Andalou (1929).  Based upon a  script by playwright Antonin Artaud, who later disowned the film, the plot (such as there is) involves a clergyman (Alex Allin) who lusts after the woman ( Genica seashell and the clergyman 4Athanasiou) of a general ( Lucien Bataille) all the while suffering strange visions of death and lust and struggling against his own eroticism    All this is played out through dreamlike imagery, daring editing techniques and a rich seashell_and_clergyman 2sense of the absurd. The film’s most famous review was issued by the British Board of Film Censors: ‘This film is so cryptic as to be almost meaningless. If there is a meaning, it is doubtless objectionable.’  Find out more at  sensesofcinema.com  Being screened as part of the Shuffle Festival with live musical accompaniment from Minima and Stephen Horne.  Cemetery Park, Tower hamlets, London.    Link

 Golem_1920_Postergolem 1920 2The Golem: How He Came Into The World (Dir. Paul Wegener/Carl Boese, 1920) (Screening format – not known, 85 mins) Set in the ghetto in 16th Century Prague,  Rabbi Loew (Albert Steinruck), feels that the Jewish community is in danger so begins to sculpt a golem (Paul Wegener), a man of clay.  When the emperor orders the evacuation of all Jews the Rabbi brings the statue to life and demonstrates its superhuman strength to warn off the emperor.  But  will the golem 1920 3Rabbi be able to keep control over his creation.   Serving as a prequel to Wegener’s earlier film The Golem (1915), of which only fragments remain, this is a carefully crafted and visually impressive work, enhanced by memorably bizarre sets, which has lost little of its power over the decades.  Find out more at  wikipedia.org    Being screened as part of the Shuffle Festival with a recorded soundtrack from Black Francis.  Cemetery Park, Tower hamlets, London.    Link

Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – not known, 77mins)  For film details see 1 July above.  Presented as part of the Somme100Film Centenary Tour.  With live musical accompaniment by the Camden Symphony Orchestra conducted by Levon Parikian  Christ Church, Spitalfields London E1  Link 

10 July

battle-of-the-somme-01Battle of the Somme (Dir.Geoffrey Malins, 1916)  (Screening format – 35mm, 74mins)  The Battle of the Somme gave its 1916 audience an unprecedented insight into the realities of trench warfare, controversially including the depiction of dead and wounded soldiers. It shows scenes of the build-up to the infantry offensive including the massive preliminary bombardment, coverage of the first day of the battle (the bloodiest single day in Britain’s military history) and depictions of the small gains and massive costs of the attack. The Battle of the Somme remains one of the most successful British films ever made. It is estimated over 20 million tickets were sold in Great Britain in the first two months of release, and the film was distributed world-wide to demonstrate to allies and neutrals Britain’s commitment to the First World War. It is the source of many of that conflict’s most iconic images. It was made by British official cinematographers Geoffrey Malins and John McDowell. Though it was not intended as a feature film, once the volume and quality of their footage had been seen in London, the British Topical Committee for War Films decided to compile a feature-length film.  Find out more at Wikipedia With recorded Laura Rossi score.   BFI Southbank, London   Link

12 July

womens-volounteer-army-01Britannia’s Daughters: Women Workers of WWI  (Screening format – not known, 90mins)  Women were, of course, already working in all kinds of capacities before the war, but during wartime many more were needed and in different jobs. We’re used to seeing WWII land girls and munitions workers on film but less so from the First World War, making this selection of films from the IWM and BFI all the more unique. In it we look at all aspects of women’s work and the supportive emotional roles they would play.  Introduced by Matthew Lee, Imperial War Museum, and Bryony Dixon, curator BFI.  BFI Southbank, London     Link

15 July

sunrise-1Sunrise: A Song Of Two Humans (Dir. F W Murnau, 1927) (Screening format – 35mm) A woman vacationing from the City (Margaret Livingston) lingers in a lakeside town. After dark, she goes to a farmhouse where the Man (George O’Brien) and the Wife (Janet Gaynor) live. She whistles from the fence outside. The Man is torn, but finally departs, leaving his wife with the memories of better times when they were deeply in love. The man and woman kiss passionately. She wants him to sell his farm and join her in the city. Then she suggests that he solve the problem of his wife by drowning her…. Considered by some to be the greatest film of the silent era, Sunrise is at very least a combination of artistic triumph and artistic enigma. Perhaps the finest example of the melding of German visual design with American studio production techniques, Sunrise is an oddly disconnected story that still manages to reach its audience with its tremendous emotional undercurrent. At times surreal and dreamlike in its imagery, Sunrise is both thought provoking and lyrical in its portrayal of the human condition and plays with both the light and dark shades of love and life. Find out more at Wikipedia  Presented as part of Phoenix Cinema’s first Silent Film Festival.  Introduced by Pamela Hutchinson with live musical accompaniment  by Stephen Horne. Phoenix Cinema, East Finchley, London  Link

16 July

steamboat billSteamboat Bill Jr   ( (Dir. Buster Keaton, 1928)  (Screening format – 35mm, 71mins)     This special family show with musician and broadcaster Neil Brand celebrates the comic genius of Buster Keaton with clips of his most famous gags and stunts followed by a full screening of Keaton’s magnificent 1928 feature Steamboat Bill Jr . As well as accompanying the films on piano Neil talks about how the music is working and gets the children involved in what music is needed. The best possible introduction to silent cinema from a master of the craft.   In Steamboat Bill Jr A crusty river boat captain hopes that his long departed son’s return will help him compete with a business rival.  Unfortunately, William Canfield Jnr (Buster Keaton) is an effete college boy.  Worse still, he has fallen for the business rival’s daughter (Marion Byron).  Not a commercial success at the time, this is now rightly regarded as a Keaton classic.    Find out more at Wikipedia        Presented as part of Phoenix Cinema’s first Silent Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment  by Neil Brand. Phoenix Cinema, East Finchley, London    Link

why be good 2Why Be Good  (Dir. William A. Seiter, 1929) (Screening format – 35mm, 84 mins) Starring the delightful Coleen Moore as Pert Kelly, this film tells the tale of a vibrant shop assistant who enjoys wild parties and dancing. She falls in love with a dashing well-to-do man who, unbeknownst to her, is in fact the son of the Why be goodowner of the department store in which she works. Comedy ensues as Pert is put to the test in order to prove herself worthy of the wealthy shop owner’s son.  Considered for a long time to be lost, Why Be Good was rediscovered in the 1990’s at which time it was restored and placed alongside its original Vitaphone soundtrack. It is one of few films therefore, that provides a bridge between silent cinema and the talkies. A showcase for the fun and excess associated with the flapper era, Why Be Good is a fast paced morality ride ripe with mischief and energy. Find out more  at   wikipedia.org    Presented as part of Phoenix Cinema’s first Silent Film Festival.   Phoenix Cinema, East Finchley, London   Link

17 July

London on filmLondon on Film   Film historian Ian Christie presents a selection of archive films that reflect the diverse history of North London and the area surrounding the Phoenix.  Presented as part of Phoenix Cinema’s first Silent Film Festival.  With musical accompaniment from John Sweeney.  Phoenix Cinema, East Finchley, London Link

East_is_East'East is East (Dir. Henry Edwards, 1916) (Screening format – 35mm, 80 mins) You can take the girl out of Stepney but, as this film posits, you can’t take Stepney out of the girl. Faced with unexpected rags to riches and forced to live a life in which you’re taught “not to drop your h’s but to drop your friends…” East-end girl Victoria (Florence Turner) struggles to come to terms with east is east 2West-end boys and their weak ways. East is East is a thoroughly entertaining film and very British in its refusal to take itself too seriously. Laugh out loud moments aside it carries a sincere message routed in class struggle that still resonates today. Find out more at   wikipedia.org    Presented as part of Phoenix Cinema’s first Silent Film Festival.  Master of Ceremonies will be Gerry Turvey. With piano accompaniment by Lillian HenleyPhoenix Cinema, East Finchley, London    Link

19 July

feeding-a-nation-01Food Fight (Screening format – not known, 90mins) Food is central to morale in times of war. Filmmakers became obsessed by Britain’s food supply, as we witness in this fascinating compilation of films from the IWM and BFI. Observe how the soldiers ate, how we fought blockades at sea, made dumplings from potato peelings, foraged for blackberries, persuaded the posh to cut their consumption like everyone else, and how women, children and grandfathers took up the burden as the land was stripped of men and horses.  Introduced by Jane Fish, Imperial War Museum, and Bryony Dixon, BFI.  BFI Southbank, London  Link

21 July

around-china-with-a-movie-camera-01Around China With A Movie Camera: A Journey From Beijing To Shanghai  (Screening format – not known, 68mins) Take a trip back to China in the first half of the 20th century with this programme of extraordinary, rare and beautiful travelogues, newsreels and home movies, screened with a brand new live score by composer Ruth Chan. These films, all from the BFI’s National Archive, were made by a wealth of British and French filmmakers – from professionals to intrepid tourists, colonial-era expatriates and Christian missionaries. Exploring 50 years of Chinese history across a diverse range of footage, the collection includes what might be the oldest surviving film to be shot in China, unseen for over 115 years.  With live musical accompaniment by Ruth Chan.  BFI Southbank, London   Link

24 July

lodger 1lodger 5The Lodger: A Story Of The London Fog   (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1927) (Screening format – not known, 91 mins) Whilst a serial killer known as ‘The Avenger’ is murdering blonde women in the foggy streets of night-time London,  a mysterious man arrives at the house of Mr. and Mrs. Bunting looking for a room to rent…  The Lodger is generally acknowledged to be the film where Hitchcock properly found his “voice”: that distinctive combination of death and fetishism, trick shots and music-hall humour, intense menace and elegant camerawork that assured his place among cinema’s giants.  The material, drawn from a novel by Marie Belloc Lowndes (sister of Hilaire), is rather obviously inspired by the Jack the Ripper murders; they were still within living memory.  This is a story of betrayal, obsession and persecution, all triggered by the arrival of the extraordinary figure of Ivor Novello at an anonymous boarding house in some London backstreet.  Find out more at  www.silentfilm.org   With live organ accompaniment.  Regent Street Cinema, London  Link

25 July

metropolis-01Metropolis (Dir. Fritz Lange, 1927) (Screening format –DCP , 153 mins ) Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder (Gustav Frohlich), the wealthy son of the city’s ruler, and Maria (Brigitte Helm), a poor worker, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes of their city. Filming took place in 1925 at a cost of approximately five million Reichmarks, making it the most expensive film ever released up to that point. It is regarded as a pioneering work of science fiction and is among the most influential films of all time. Following its world premiere in 1927, half an hour was cut from Fritz Lang’s masterpiece and lost to the world. Eighty years later a spectacular discovery was made when the footage was found in a small, dusty museum in Buenos Aires. The film was then painstakingly reconstructed and digitally restored with a new recording of the original score. At last audiences could see the iconic futuristic fairy tale as Lang had envisioned it. Find out more at  silentfilm.org Featuring Gottfried Huppertz recorded score.  BFI Southbank, London Link

26 July

frightfulness and fair playFrightfulness Versus Fair-Play: British Animation in World War One.  (Screening format – not known, 90mins) You can do anything with a cartoon. Wartime propaganda was always at its most virulent in animated cartoons, but it was also good for military instruction on everything from flight, to gas masks, to how to drive a lorry around horse-drawn carriages! Through a selection of rarely screened films this presentation will show the boost war gave to a fledgling industry, as animation developed from a gimmick to an art form.  Introduced by Tony Haggith, Imperial War Museum, and Jez Stewart, curator BFI.  BFI Southbank, London Link

30 July

220px-MetropolisposterMetropolis (Dir. Fritz Lange, 1927) (Screening format –DCP , 153 mins ) Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder (Gustav Frohlich), the wealthy son of the city’s ruler, and Maria (Brigitte Helm), a poor worker, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes of their city. Filming took place in 1925 at a cost of approximately five million Reichmarks, making it the most expensive film ever released up to that point. It is regarded as a pioneering work of science fiction and is among the most influential films of all time. Following its world premiere in 1927, half an hour was cut from Fritz Lang’s masterpiece and lost to the world. Eighty years later a spectacular discovery was made when the footage was found in a small, dusty museum in Buenos Aires. The film was then painstakingly reconstructed and digitally restored with a new recording of the original score. At last audiences could see the iconic futuristic fairy tale as Lang had envisioned it. Find out more at  silentfilm.org Featuring Gottfried Huppertz recorded score.  BFI Southbank, London Link

31 July

Metropolis (Dir. Fritz Lange, 1927) (Screening format –DCP , 153 mins ) Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder (Gustav Frohlich), the wealthy son of the city’s ruler, and Maria (Brigitte Helm), a poor worker, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes of their city. Filming took place in 1925 at a cost of approximately five million Reichmarks, making it the most expensive film ever released up to that point. It is regarded as a pioneering work of science fiction and is among the most influential films of all time. Following its world premiere in 1927, half an hour was cut from Fritz Lang’s masterpiece and lost to the world. Eighty years later a spectacular discovery was made when the footage was found in a small, dusty museum in Buenos Aires. The film was then painstakingly reconstructed and digitally restored with a new recording of the original score. At last audiences could see the iconic futuristic fairy tale as Lang had envisioned it. Find out more at  silentfilm.org Featuring Gottfried Huppertz recorded score.  BFI Southbank, London Link

 


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