North of England

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2 April

underground 2Underground  (Dir. Anthony Asquith, 1928) (Screen format – not known, 93mins)  Bert, an electrician, and Bill, a London Underground porter both fall in love with Nell. But when Nell chooses Bill, Bert resorts to devious tactics. The social spaces of 1920s London play an important role in Asquith’s working-class love story. Most central to the narrative of the film is the London Underground itself, its bustling public corridors and carriages providing an arena in which people from all walks of life intermingle. Although Underground was only Asquith‘s second film (and the first for which he would receive a full directing credit ), he handles the melodramatic story with sophistication. As in Alfred Hitchcock‘s The Lodger (1926) and Blackmail (1929), the psychological aspects of the narrative are illustrated with imaginative touches that draw upon a variety of European cinematic influences such as German Expressionism and Soviet MontageUnderground came in for its share of criticism on release.  The general public complained about the “distorted” angles and “murky” lighting, while others criticised the upper-class Asquith as unequipped to understand the common people.   But today, Underground is recognised as a fine film, and a thoroughly entertaining one (particularly in this beautifully restored new version), with a chase scene as gripping as anything else in British cinema, made by a perennially underrated Englishman and giving a glimpse of a vanished English world. Find out more at silentfilm.org   With live musical accompaniment by HarmonieBand  (find out more about them here Harmonieband)Hyde Park Picture House, Leeds  Link

3 April

Underground-1-e1356023713114Underground  (Dir. Anthony Asquith, 1928) (Screen format – not known, 93mins)  Bert, an electrician, and Bill, a London Underground porter both fall in love with Nell. But when Nell chooses Bill, Bert resorts to devious tactics. The social spaces of 1920s London play an important role in Asquith’s working-class love story. Most central to the narrative of the film is the London Underground itself, its bustling public corridors and carriages providing an arena in which people from all walks of life intermingle. Although Underground was only Asquith‘s second film (and the first for which he would receive a full directing credit ), he handles the melodramatic story with sophistication. As in Alfred Hitchcock‘s The Lodger (1926) and Blackmail (1929), the psychological aspects of the narrative are illustrated with imaginative touches that draw upon a variety of European cinematic influences such as German Expressionism and Soviet MontageUnderground came in for its share of criticism on release.  The general public complained about the “distorted” angles and “murky” lighting, while others criticised the upper-class Asquith as unequipped to understand the common people.   But today, Underground is recognised as a fine film, and a thoroughly entertaining one (particularly in this beautifully restored new version), with a chase scene as gripping as anything else in British cinema, made by a perennially underrated Englishman and giving a glimpse of a vanished English world. Find out more at silentfilm.org   With live musical accompaniment by HarmonieBand (find out more about them here Harmonieband)Home Cinema, Manchester   Link

15 April

Silent Comedy Night .  (Screening formar – DVD) Five of the most well known, iconic and hilarious comedians from the silent film era; Buster Keaton, Charlie Chaplin, Harold Lloyd and Laurel & Hardy, all played back to back. (Film titles not known)  With live musical accompaniment by Seamus Carey.   The Boo,  Waterfoot, Rossendale  Link